#44 "Work-From-Home Culture with Dave Helmly of Adobe"

April 08, 2020 00:42:19
#44 "Work-From-Home Culture with Dave Helmly of Adobe"
The Workflow Show
#44 "Work-From-Home Culture with Dave Helmly of Adobe"
/

Show Notes

How has the immediate need to work remotely affected our editing and production disciplines? How are creatives, and the solutions they use, rapidly adapting to the challenges that we're all facing in this evolving culture? In the first part of this two-part episode, Ben and Jason hunker down at home and discuss how the sudden need for a new work-from-home culture has affected the media and entertainment industry. Joining them is Adobe's own expert workflow therapist, Dave Helmly. The workflow therapists discuss disciplines, considerations, and solutions that creatives are now employing in their work-from-home toolkits.   [gravityform id="1" title="true" description="true"]
View Full Transcript

Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:00 You're listening to the workflow show, Chesapeake systems, media production technology and workflow therapy podcast. I'm your host, Jason Whetstone, Adobe creative cloud, premier illustrator, Photoshop. If you're listening to this episode of the podcast, chances are those might be some of the names associated with the tools you use in your everyday creative toolkit. Today on episode 44 of the workflow show, we'll talk about the status of integrations with and roadmaps of Adobe and creative cloud, what media asset management integrations are being done with apps like premier pro, and how, and what about AI? Can we get those robots and creative cloud to do some metadata tagging or analysis for us and what's on the horizon for creative cloud? We'll also talk about, uh, an extremely pertinent subject at this time and the history of our industry, remote editing. Um, I'd like to first introduce my cohost, just a senior solutions architect, Ben Kilburg. Speaker 0 00:56 Hi, Ben. How did Jason howdy. Um, so Ben, we're working in an extremely challenging time in our history, not just the history of the media and entertainment industry or the United States or Europe, but in our world, we're fighting an existential health crisis that is affecting every industry, every country, and unfortunately every human being in our world. And our listeners are probably weary from this subject at the moment. But I do think it's a very important time in the storybook of our planet. And, uh, you know, the coven 19 pandemic is affecting every industry on the globe. So how's it affecting media and entertainment, Ben? Um, well for starters, we're all sitting at home currently. Nobody's in their office. Uh, we are currently recording the workflow show remotely and screen-sharing via RingCentral. So I think this is the date of the art for everybody. Currently, we're a few weeks in, I would say, uh, on the, on the United States side. Speaker 0 02:00 So, um, you know, a lot of the rest of the world has already, um, experienced. But we're getting into now, as Ben said, we're recording the workflow show completely remotely. Uh, NAB has been canceled. Sports organizations have completely suspended all their operations. Uh, the TV and film industry is pretty much on hold. It's a very interesting time for us. Uh, Ben and I are, you know, in our forties and we haven't really seen anything like this in our lifetime. So for those of you who are younger than your forties, uh, this is kind of unprecedented for us and, uh, you know, we, we just wanted to acknowledge that. And uh, with that I wanted to introduce our guests. So today, joining us from his own home, uh, is Adobe's head of field operations Provideo us East creative cloud enterprise. Dave, humbly, thanks for joining us Dave. Hey guys, happy to be here and uh, like you, I'm happy to be here in Maryland, safe at, uh, Speaker 1 03:00 Helping editors every day with this, with this crisis. As you said, Speaker 0 03:04 We are glad that you are healthy and glad that you are helping. So I guess before we get started with our discussion, let's step away from the state of things for a moment and talk about yourself a little bit, Dave. So how did you get to where you are today? With Adobe. What is this field? What does a head of field operations do? Speaker 1 03:21 So yeah, I've been, I've been at Adobe almost 25 years. Um, work with Chesapeake for probably just as long with you guys. You guys have been a great partner and always happy to root for the home team as I tell. Uh, although I do treat all my integrators the same, but it's always of kind of fun to jump on these podcasts with you guys. And yeah, so I am part of a field team. I think we've got about 15 people worldwide now. We kind of act as consultants, um, obviously, which is very timely this week to try to get people up and running under certain, uh, certain conditions. But it's kind of things that we do all the time. You know, whether or not it's, it's picking out shared storage or a ma'am or just the proper configuration for certain types of workflows. And what's the best way to spend my money? Speaker 1 04:06 You know, should I get a new Mac with afterburner? Should I get an HP or Dell or some other computer? You know, depending on, on what these guys are doing and what their workflow looks like. So we're, we're kind of just a group of workflow specialist and all we've done for the past, you know, many of the team members have been 10, 15 plus years on the team. Like we kind of know this workflow inside and out and we just basically um, consult for those customers and we rely heavily a lot on third parties and integrators like yourselves to really get that message out and to make sure you guys have the tools you need to then pass on to the customers. It's great cause it's, you know, in, in my field it's a two way street because we rely so much on what you guys are learning from the customer as well as the customer themselves. Speaker 1 04:52 Bringing that back, another big part of what our team does is we actually report back to engineering on what you guys are finding. Customers want this feature. This is sort of acting wonky. Why can't we get a better performance on this, this and this. We then take that back to Apple and Microsoft or Intel or even AMD and Nvidia and we sort of say, look, we need speed boost here. We need this. Or there's this new technology like when QuickSync came out, um, we sort of go back to those engineering teams and our own engineering teams, uh, and get these features requested. A lot of what you see in premiere and after effects that we'll talk about today actually come directly from our team and the conversations because one way that premier has really accelerated over the years is to have customer interaction and customers vote on the features that they want the most. Speaker 1 05:44 And a large part of what we really need to do is to try to help people with, you know, versioning and how do I get from this version to that version, Hey, I'm crashing when this happens and we need to sort of remind them why crashes happen. Um, it's not that they're self-inflicted, cause I, I never put that on a customer. But a lot of times it's just being aware of certain things that have changed and cleaning cash files and why that's important as new math changes as we make codecs faster and things like that. So it's a multifaceted job. I mean, it's pretty exciting. All the different ways that we, uh, we, we take this info and get it back to engineering. That's awesome. Um, so for, so for our listeners, this is really the sort of behind the scenes things that are happening as you guys are, you know, working with your content, working with your users. Speaker 1 06:31 Um, we are, uh, we chess, uh, David, Adobe, his team are working in the background to make it better. So, uh, just to, just to sort of illustrate how things work, work in the background as, as, as these new features come out. One of the things that we've implemented, um, this week guys, that, um, if Jess has not signed up, we should probably get you guys signed up, is we introduced a thing called beta prime. So beta prime is going to allow customers to go to their creative cloud and they're going to see beta versions of the apps that they signed up for. It's going to start with video and we've got a select group now that we've said, okay, let's turn this on for users. So they get to see what's going on and you get to test, um, you know, a new camera or you get to test maybe how after burners working, uh, on the new max. Speaker 1 07:20 So they get that question all the time or, or other types of features, new things coming to after effects. So this isn't to sort of turn people into Guinea pigs. Really, it's to say, okay, look, this is your chance to have a voice that says, okay, this feature is working great, or this feature is not, or I have a project that requires this type of pro res raw, or whatever it is. That's the media I've given. I would love the opportunity to at least to attempt to edit this project. Let me go ahead and try the beta. So we get, we get this opportunity to try to help you. You're helping us. So that's just another example of, um, how to help out with what's going on right now. So I have a lot of people signed up. Yeah. This is a great program. Yeah, that's awesome. Speaker 1 08:02 So the last time Dave was on the workflow show is way before my time at Chesa in September, 2013 back when Nicole and Meryl Davis were hosting the show. Um, so it was a much different time in the industry and certainly a much different time for our world. So, uh, Dave, how is this pandemic affecting your work? Um, I think it's gotta be the same with you guys. I mean, I think this is where a lot of us parallel, which is really, it's, it's customer centric, customer focused, which is we're in a very reactive mode right now, which again, which is great for our team because as you know, we're not, we're not here to sell customers anything. We're just here to say, look, let's just make sure you're using it and you're happy with what's going on. So, you know, let's face it, you're happy about paying your subscription, however you've signed up for that. Speaker 1 08:49 So the idea is to keep things going all the time. So in this particular instance, you know, we've got these at-home editors. It's funny and listening to your, uh, to your, you know, sort of intro into this this morning with the COBIT stuff going on. I think a lot of what needs to happen now is about discipline. You know, let's not talk about, you know, what it takes just to deal with COBIT and that sort of isolation discipline. But it's also editing discipline, um, which, you know, you gotta hand it to companies, you know, like avid who have had these disciplines for awhile and even early final cut seven who have had, it's kind of a pro Rez discipline. Think about where your media is coming, where's it going? What w what are you asking the computer to do? Do you really need two monitors when you're doing some sort of remote VPN edit back and forth? Speaker 1 09:35 You really need to be editing 4k or should you be using proxies? Um, because one of the things that's great about Adobe is we allow you to get as crazy creative as you want. Throw anything on the timeline. You know, everything goes great until all hell breaks loose because you know, it's hard to get all of these different codecs to behave themselves in a way that you want to sort of, you know, make your brain go faster than your timeline, which is how, you know, we like to view the Adobe creative editor. But times like this, I just start thinking about discipline. So a lot of what we've been talking to customers about, certainly over the past 10 days, is how to build up some of these disciplines at home and what are the expectations that they really need to start working on. So when we start thinking about, you know, shared storage and, and how do I get to my ma'am and all these other different things, you know, start logically thinking about I'm at home, I got log into VPN that there's going to be a block on some sort of speed that I need for whatever reason. Speaker 1 10:32 And then I'm going to be able to get to this timeline. So, um, it's been going fairly well. I'll say we've been dealing a lot with, uh, the cloud partners. So AWS, Azure, Google have all been fantastic. I'm actually leading a POC project. I've been doing it for about six months on cloud editing. Happy to say the POC is just going great. I've got standups all around the planet that I log into and we've got amazing things happening with the cloud partners right now. And I'm happy to say that certainly the video apps totally behave themselves in a virtual environment. I'm also working with companies like HP using their RGS, you know, remote graphics system, which I think now has a, has a new name. Um, I forget what they call it, but I've been running that and that's a way to say, Oh well you're dealing with Adobe substance and you need a heavy GPU that I might not be able to get on virtual. Let me go ahead and log in remotely to that PC. By the way, even though I'm on a Mac as I am today, you know, HP for example, has got a client, Tara DG has got a client that allows us to do that. So a large part of his discipline has been giving customers all these different options and really doing more listening than recommending just hearing the customer out what they need to do and then giving them a couple of options and of course circling and partners to chime in yourselves. Speaker 2 11:55 That's only to say that sounds familiar, Ben. That sounds an awful lot like what a solutions architect would do. Indeed. Yep. Yeah. So I think our lives parallel more than people may realize. Absolutely. So two episodes ago we had our fine friend Michael from bebop. I'm talking about how they're implementing the Adobe stuff in the cloud using the Terry DG software. So, um, if our listeners haven't checked that out and you're curious about how that works, we'll talk about it a little bit here right now just so that we can review it quickly. But that's a good resource and a reference to go back and listen to because we kind of dig into how it works there. Absolutely. And the funny thing about that episode is that it was, it was really focusing on like as of that episode w where is the industry at? Speaker 2 12:42 Uh, that was, that was back in November. That was before anyone even knew about coven 19. So, uh, it's, it's really interesting how quickly things have changed since that episode came. And they also came out very a very short time ago by the way, which I do work a lot with Michael and John and the crew. Great group out there. Very smart guys that know video editing. Cause I, that'd be good for the listeners to, uh, to hear. Yeah, those guys are busy. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to cut you off there. No, right. So quickly. Um, the just with bebop is they are using Tera DG software in the background and they have built really cool stuff in the foreground to help people who need or want to work remotely to gather up their files, um, and get it into the cloud and then fire up Adobe premiere on a workstation running in the cloud. And then on the background, the Terra DG software is doing a really good job of just streaming the pixels you need back to your remote workstation. So you're sitting on your couch like you've always wanted to do. And the software's there. Speaker 1 13:50 Yeah, I had been using bebop for a while. We made a public announcement with them last and AB that they're one of our approved vendors. We have a couple of them for these VDI systems. And one of the things I'd like to point out about bebop that I've always been impressed with is they come from the video editing background. That's the most important thing for some of the listeners to know that video editing and compositing as their main form of, uh, of employment, if you will. Um, they know it. So they're what I would call a white glove service. So if you sign up for Azure, AWS or Google, you have to kind of go through a menu, talk to a rep about what it is. I mean, if they're going to do a pretty good job of sort of sizing you and getting things ready where bebop. Speaker 1 14:32 Um, and some of the other ones that we have, you know, know what it is that you're trying to do and they're going to lead you down the right path. Like you said, they have their fast upload, but what if you need to connect to your local, ma'am? Well, they have ways to do that and connect you to your, like you said, your own shared storage. It is a great service. Um, the cost on it is, is surprising, um, uh, in a good way, uh, that it's not as bad as you might think. And, um, for our Mac users it works great on a Mac. I mean, it's fast. I'm also running a zero client when I attached to some of these, these other hands, I've been an amulet box. Um, and you know, I, I do find that having a laptop, uh, like my Mac or some of the windows laptops that I have, um, you actually get a little bit better performance cause I think you get a little more beef on the laptop side with graphics and the new CPU is that it works great. Speaker 1 15:23 And one thing that I find surprising that people don't realize is when you connect a second display, Tara DT just does a great job of, I mean even if you just connect it midstream of once the desktop comes up, it resets itself and says, Oh, you've got two displays, you jump into premiere after effects, you can actually mirror on that second display with near zero latency depending on your, uh, your connection. And part of the discussion by the way, that just users need to know is part of what bebop will ask you or things for you to think about is where is the storage versus where is the remote computer? If they're in the same facility, um, you're going to find the latency to be next to nothing. I mean it's, it's amazing how well it works. I, and I demo it all the time. Speaker 1 16:09 I actually have demoed it in an Uber, going to had a customer in the car that wanted to see how it worked and I'm like, I'll let me just attach on my hotspot attached on my phone. I had it, I had a decent 4g signal riding to the airport. Of course, a little bit of latency to be expected, but if you needed to review quick work on your way to the airport, um, when those days come back, looking forward to that. Um, but uh, just kidding, cause I take a lot of planes. It's nice to, uh, to have a little bit of a break. But anyway, the hotspot didn't, did work. And I think with what you're talking about today, times have definitely changed to where people, um, can start to experiment and look at this and it's going to change the way people edit and think about editing from here on out. Speaker 0 16:49 Well, it's, it's, it almost seems like that's one thing that I do see coming out of the situation with this pandemic is realistic expectations on where things are currently today. And I think this is just skyrocketing that need just so quickly. So, uh, you know, it, it's not about like we'll get, we'll get to it when we get around to it or we'll, we'll see when we need it. We might, we might look into it. It's, it's now we need it now. Speaker 1 17:12 By the way, again, a great example of workflow I just worked on this weekend. Um, cause again, you know, we, we are here to help. We've got customers that are just calling us and a lot of them have my number, they'll text me and say, you know, we've got this issue. Uh, because one of the things is, as you guys know, and for those listeners that don't know, there's this thing called the media supply chain that they bank on. We talk about it, certainly Adobe about, you know, how do we keep this 24 hour content? People need to be able to view it. So I'm working with a client this weekend on set with celebrities that want to have, whether it's a coded message or just some sort of social messaging in their home or, or small studios. And they just want to get out there and be heard and, and, and say what they want to say, but they don't know how to edit. Speaker 1 17:55 So they're using Adobe premier rush, you know, on their iPhones, which is our little mobile editor, uh, that syncs with rush on the Mac or windows desktop or you can just bring it into premiere. So they're using the rush camera recording themselves that then goes up to creative cloud, comes down independently of anything they have set up, it's all auto sank. And then from there they can either finish it in a rush or they just bring it into premiere and after effects and sweeten it however they need to do it. But, but it's kinda cool to kind of watch the workflow from where we are in this crisis and say, well, this isn't that big of a deal. So having these remote camera type apps like you could have with premier rush and then this bring it right on into the workflow I think is a new way of thinking about content. Speaker 1 18:42 And again, keeping these supply chains going and keeping things relevant. That's cool. And the iPhone 11 pro has a pretty amazing camera. It's not fair. The other thing by the way that I use, and if you guys are familiar with it, I use a biographer. Have you guys seen that? You know, it's one for the iPad or the iPhone has different lenses. It's basically a kit that you can snap your iPhone or iPad into and it has mounts for your road. Mike and tripods and lights and all these other things. And the <inaudible> has been huge. I mean the people have just trying to figure out how do I get a better picture, um, and keep it steady. So those are pretty awesome. And actually developed by the way, by a former actor was Steven Seagal, uh, back in those days as turn school teacher trying to get kids using mobile phones with basically would in duct tape. Speaker 1 19:32 Give him something to hold on to. And he developed this geographer holder thing that you can get in the Apple store and things. But I love to see solutions like that cause I think all of this, this sort of, how do we just get people on these awesome devices to get this content in for editing to keep the supply chain going. Yep. So a couple of things I heard in there. One, just to roll it back to bebop really quickly, you mentioned the zero client zero client is a fun little box, right? Yeah. It's like a dumb little faker box that gives you your video IO as well as USB access so that you can control, Hey look, you're holding it up. I'll even screenshot that so somebody might even be able to see it right here. I'll do it. I'll do it that way. That beautiful. Yeah. So, so yeah, it's two monitors on the back. As you contact you. This one will take four. I probably wouldn't recommend four and your USB devices on that. So zero clients are another way, although those aren't cheap. By the way, those run five to 900 bucks as you guys probably know. So yeah. So one of the conversations that I know we're having with people here is that rolling back to bebop a little bit, most folks aren't in the position to Speaker 2 20:48 Be able to roll out a solution like that right now. Right? It takes a few weeks to stand it up. The guys at bebop are really busy because everybody who had the ability to do that jumped in the queue really quick. So there's how we deal with what's happening currently and then how we prepare for the future and before all of covert 19 and all of this madness with the pandemic hit. Um, that's really how bebop positioned themselves was that it was for disaster recovery, meaning that there was a disaster like this that we're all facing. And how can you take your media, um, have people work from home and still get stuff done, right? Um, so having something like a zero client is a way to prepare for that in the future where you can just directly access and stream from the Terra dichi or bebop cloud solution into this device, which then acts like a gateway to the PC in the cloud. Speaker 2 21:44 Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and Tara GG for people that are just trying to, because we keep saying that a lot, it's really just like the screen share apps that you have that you may have been experiencing for conferences and things over the past couple of weeks. It's going to, as you said, team viewer. Right. So the Mac client is really responsive. The windows laptop version is also very responsive and it's just sending those pixels back and forth as you said. And it's really, really good at compression and sort of seeing the regions that move on on screen, which is why the latency is a, is almost next to zero if you have a halfway decent connection and a Starbucks connection by the way is fine. Cause I, I do be bought from a Starbucks all the time. Yeah. Interesting. That's awesome. Make sure you're going to connect to a VPN if you, if you've gotten it in Starbucks. Speaker 2 22:31 Yep. The other thing to mention with that is we talked a little bit about the pricing. We'll certainly won't get into it there, but um, so there's a subscription fee from a service like that where you're paying them to essentially keep the lights on and keep it up and running. But then there's the pass through of the cloud service provider as well. So it's not by way of comparison to the upkeep on a large stand in a media asset management environment. It's not, you know, a terrible cost, but there is definitely an additional cost with paying for that. And it's by the minute, right, where you spin this up and you only want to use it when you're using it and then it's smart enough. They've got some ability within the platform itself to say, Oh, nobody's moved the cursor for 20 minutes or whatever time to shut it down and see that you're not wasting your money. And they also have an auto log out for the Adobe apps that we actually gave them, that they run on there. And to sort of protect anyone else that takes over that machine. I mean, one example of users are curious when you, when you launch bebop, they've kind of cloaked or scanned the Tara DG experience, right? Um, with, with their own UI. And when you log in, I see for my Adobe account, I see six machines that I can then go attach and then Speaker 1 23:45 I can see who else is editing what machines are in, in use. And then I can click up one and it probably takes, I dunno, three or four minutes for that to boot versus I have some other direct to cloud accounts, uh, with Azure and AWS and Google where those machines are on 24, seven and I can connect to those and literally under five seconds it's that fast. And, and I'm editing. Um, but that's a way more expensive, uh, solution to have than one that just powers onto your point. So if people have gotten pricing and they're like, Oh my gosh, this is way out of my budget, it's probably because you were looking at the wrong one, you were looking at one that just always stays on versus one that be bought that you power up when you need it. So take the time to reach out to some of these, what I would call white glove services like bebop and hear them out and they can get you on whatever cloud you want. Speaker 1 24:40 You can say, I'd like AWS or I'd like Azure or Google. You can kind of pick the one that you want. They may recommend which one's best for you based on where you are and which of those hubs you're closest to for the best experience. I think the distinction there is that you need to use their accounts for those. Is that, is that correct? Correct. Correct. That's the right. Bring your own storage. Yeah. Yeah, I'm right. I've always been impressed with the partners that we've selected, like, uh, like bebop is they know video editing. And I should also say this, that the only products that have been approved on VDI for companies like bebop have been the video products cause our team started that for remote editing. I think since then on bebop we've added in design and of course Photoshop and illustrator are part of that mix because they create content for uh, you know, premiere and for after faxes, that's where you sort of assemble things and animate things. Speaker 1 25:35 But um, but other products and stuff, you know, uh, I've been taking internal messaging, uh, you know, to Adobe and engineering teams to sort of get more people aware at Adobe on, on what's going on. But we're starting with a lot of the video products. Uh, right now. Uh, it's a lot of education on our part too, by the way, for the different different cloud vendors. So we've developed different personas. I've been working on this for the past couple of months when I guarantee you were, uh, you and I are working on similar customers here in the region for sure, but we're working on this worldwide to let them know that there's a news and simple edit. There's a typical Adobe creative edit, there's news and promo and then there's long form. Each of those have very specific requirements and a mission that I've been on and tasked with this year I should say for 2020 is getting all the cloud vendors educated, the big three on what those personas are and what they mean. Speaker 1 26:32 Because we want to know when the customer calls into one of these cloud vendors and says, Hey, I'm, you know, I want to get premiere up and running on your instance. And they can say, okay, well hopefully they look at the notes that we're trying to provide these guys with and they ask the right follow on questions, which is what type of edit. You don't want to pay for too much GPU if you're not going to use it. And again, driving the price up. But again, you go to someone like bebop, they kind of know all that and they're asking all those right questions. So, right. Yeah. For our technical, more technical listeners, it sounds a little bit similar to like if you're doing a compute in the cloud, it's cheaper to get spot instances then instances that are always on. Exactly. Exactly. Um, so yeah, it's, it's all about qualifying your actual needs. Speaker 1 27:15 But I think to our point, this, this is the future if any good comes out of this. Um, which I think we're all looking for good news these days and I think we'll be on a path to recovery. Um, you know, this is top of mind for everyone cause I don't think this is the first time this sort of thing's going to happen, but at the same time, on a brighter note, maybe it's better for a lot of these editors to be at home. Maybe they can be in their own creative space and get more work done, work the hours that they want to do. Um, you know, it's going to be really interesting to see, um, how this changes editing for the long haul. I think one of you guys had said that up front. So necessity is the mother of invention. Yes, that's right. Speaker 1 27:55 That's right. It is changing how almost every industry works and interacts. It's pretty fascinating. So yeah, something potentially good coming out of this catastrophe. We hope so. Rolling back just for a second. VDI, Dave, that's a virtual desktop interface instance instance. By the way, VDI, you know, I think if you Google it that that's the number one hit you'll get. Yeah. But some people call it VM virtual machine. VDI is kind of the new term because we've got this instance that's running remote or locally, um, in the cloud. And um, I did mention by the way, the, uh, the HP RGS, which is now called Z central remote boost. I'm looking at my Mac, uh, client here. I don't know why they came up with that name. I think RGS was that little simpler one. But again, that marketing and it'll work on any windows based machine. Speaker 1 28:49 HP, for example, and I will say Terra DG has a similar solution. I've done amazing jobs for including the power of the Mac and the iOS to harness that GPU and to give you all of that remotely. So I do have some customers that have, you know, windows machines. It's free if you happen to have an HPZ, but if you have a Dell or or Lenovo or some other home built custom system, you can also grab a license for that. But it does an amazing job of taking that Titan RTX card or RTX 6,000, which may be at work and you're at home on your, on your Mac laptop or ThinkPad laptop or whatever. Something that is not as powerful and you can harness the full power of that thing. And the machine behind me over here, I harness all the time and run that on my Mac just to sort of test out things like Adobe substance and things like that. Speaker 1 29:39 So there's multiple to skin this problem. Awesome. Well, you know, we do have people trying to use things like team viewer, um, which is you have to kind of watch the licenses on that of course. Um, but it's been a big, a big help. You know, it, it's free and a lot of instances I think Slack has been pretty awesome. Um, Oh, by the way, I got to say hats off to frame IO. Uh, we haven't talked about those guys, uh, on this remote editing, but I know they're busy. Amazing solution for certainly the Adobe apps. They've done a nice job with resolve. They've done a nice job with final cut X. You know, that company has really sort of stepped up to the plate for understanding what collaboration means. Um, in this instance, which we haven't talked much about, but uh, you know, a frame IO solution and others are pretty awesome. Speaker 1 30:27 Yeah. Iconic as another great collaboration tool. Uh, that's, that's doing really well. Yeah. So the, just with a lot of these right, is that you're working remotely on your workstation or your Mac at home or your windows at home. It's worth mentioning also with these virtual desktop instances that we're only running windows in the cloud because of the licensing from Apple. Right? We're, we're only seeing those as windows workstations. Apple has not come out to my knowledge yet, and I'm pretty up on this stuff, has not come out for a way to run a remote Mac from the cloud. Um, I don't think that should block users from jumping on this now because I like to call it the Adobe gray space, which is like, you know, once you're in it, you're in it. Projects are fully compatible. Mac and windows, we did licensed pro Rez, uh, for windows and it is Apple branded pro Rez. Speaker 1 31:22 So you get that, you get that, that full deal and no one's asking you to give up your Mac. I mean your, your Mac is, uh, is going to be there when you need it to be a Mac. And if you just need to jump into this instance, go do that and use your Mac the way you want to. So, um, I think from that standpoint, it's great. There are solutions like Splashtop uh, for you to log onto a Mac remotely. I do have a broadcaster, a very large broadcaster using splash top. So their Mac users can log in remotely from home, but that does require someone to be in the building in case something goes wonky. I'm on that machine for them to reset it. So far they're telling me it's working great. So there are a couple ways to keep your Mac. I'm a Mac, but again, I, it's really no more than than just a typical screen share where something can can go wrong. Speaker 1 32:12 Right? So the other thing with that is, Dave, like you were saying, most of these VDI guys will work with Mac key binding. So if you're used to it, you're, you know, it's just like playing an instrument, right? You want the fingerings to be the same for the chords. If you're going in switching to a different instrument, you want what you've worked years and perfecting in terms of how your hands work to manipulate the timeline. You want that to work consistently. Play it like a piano. As I say, by the way has done a great job because it detects that you're running a Mac and there's a button that says enable Mac keyboard. And when I go to talk to people about what's the right solution, how do I go experiment? And I'm like, you know, just go start with one of our partners like bebop because they understand editing because they understand keyboarding and how critical it is not to be able to, uh, to have to pick up that mouse. And some people don't ever want to touch the mouse. They want to just use their, their keyboard the way they would expect it to and have it just work. Awesome. So it's like going from a Yamaha baby grand to a Yamaha digital piano. Yeah, yeah, exactly. Similar field Yamaha's running on your iPad, right? Not exactly right. Speaker 2 33:21 Um, so we were talking briefly about frame IO in collaboration. Yeah. And so with a lot of those collaboration software platforms, the main thing we're doing is we're remotely editing with our high resolution files and then we're creating a proxy and sending it to the cloud for people to review. And then to say, Oh, I really don't like this. I'm going to Mark it. I'm going to add comments to it so that you can see it and then make the changes and then post it later. Um, then you would also mentioned Adobe rush, which is a really cool little iOS application. What other cool things if you've been seeing people doing with some of the cool new Adobe tech or out there like we've been mentioning with some of the other sharing platforms? Speaker 1 34:08 Yeah, so another one just on the collaboration front and it does remind me of rush. I'll get to that in a second. As we have this team share project that we call team projects and team projects is a way that we took our old Adobe anywhere technology and put that up and hosted it in the cloud. So we're the server for you and there's a new file type called team projects. So both premier and after effects can use that where I can invite you to my edit. So let me give you a workflow example. I'm going to put together an edit here on my home office. I've got all the media, I've pulled everything together. It doesn't really make a difference where the media is. We'll get to that in a second, but somehow I have access to it. When I'm ready to invite you guys to my edit, I just go to edit team project settings and I started inviting you guys to the team project that then converts my local project into a team projects and disables save. Speaker 1 35:07 I can no longer save because instances will be saved directly to the cloud. Uh, and also we do save a copy locally in your creative cloud folder. And then as, as I make changes, you guys get notices that there's changes or if you make changes cause you're, you're, you're also an editor. Um, then I get notices and then we have this series of up arrows and down arrows for who's changing what. And we have what I like to refer to as marriage counseling, which means what happens if we have some sort of conflict. We have conflict resolution that sort of says, Hey Dave, you're the principal or you're the owner of this edit. Ben's made a change. Do you want to say two different branches? Do you want to merge them or you do you just want to be the boss and say, sorry I win a, so you have these different choices for half or how the team edits work and you know a scenario might be, I'm the main editor, I've got Ben as my after effects guy. Speaker 1 36:05 So he's just doing all the after effects work in after effects. And there again we see the same team project instance and as he's making changes to those after effects comps, they're updating real time and premiere with these indications that tell me there's another edit change and then I can choose to reload those and edit. And those types of things have been great and we've been running team projects for about two years. It's gotten way faster. The sinking is great. And where rush fits into this is when I talked about, you know, being able to, to edit on your iPhone, do all these different things or you use it as a camera and have that sync directly to rush on your Mac or your windows machine, which is just think of it as a lighter, you know, my first Sony, you know, my first premiere type instance of editing. Speaker 1 36:57 Great for rough cutting, but it is, you know, rush is premiere pro sequence data. Um, that uses team projects on the back end cause there's no physical file interest for rush. It just lives in the cloud. And the only thing we record in the cloud is instances and changes. So whatever instances I changed and as I upload a change, I'm given an opportunity to make a quick comment. It's certainly not frame IO by any instance, but it does say, Hey, I worked on this composition, change the text, change the color and then submit. And then I'm able at any time to come back in. Maybe I'm, I'm having you guys edit over the weekend. Um, you know, I'm taking a break. I come in on Monday and I look at what Ben's done and I'm like, Holy smokes, what happened to this edit? We went to total wrong direction. Speaker 1 37:45 I can go, I can go to media and coder see a little, um, you know, a stopwatch that allows me to climb back in time, push that edit back to Friday before I left and look at all the changes over time and then choose to, uh, to go that route. So I can look at all the changes over time. So team project dispense still get paid for working all weekend. Yeah. That, although I can tell when he's editing by, by his time, it's not exactly a time management clock system like we'd have in the legal profession, but uh, um, anyway, you know, team projects, I'm seeing people use use team projects in conjunction with our proxy system. Um, as well. And the reason I mentioned rush using team projects is, you know, Russia's a very popular program. We can handle the workloads on the back end of creative cloud because Russ uses team team projects and you can even take a rush project, open it in premiere and then convert that to either a local project if you wanted to. Speaker 1 38:45 Or you could convert that to a team project and continue it. Think of someone down at the courthouse trying to get someone coming out of the car, you know, coming out of the courtroom, making a statement as a remote journalist and you know, doing a quick edit, having that sync up to the cloud and then back to someone back at home base for approval. And then someone wanting to push that right on out through their traditional premiere edit system and get graphics involved and back out to the ma'am. All that kind of works together. So the back end of that is all, um, uh, team projects. So, so it's kind of cool projects that it's sharing both the project data but then also allowing you to render some stuff in, um, that is being kept in your Adobe creative cloud storage, correct? Well, yes and no. Speaker 1 39:37 So I recommend people don't do it that way. You could cause the creative cloud folder may not be big enough depending on what you're saying. You have to kind of think of it as, as a Dropbox or one drive or one of these types of uh, of shares team projects doesn't care where the media is cause it has complete media remapping. Someone might've sent me, you know, like a Lussier or Gtech OWC drive or something with all of this red footage from a, I dunno, an eight K editor, whatever. I'm going to get all that ready locally. You have to then figure out how do I get that media to bend? Do I want to push it up to the cloud? Is it easier just to FedEx him? He can reconnect and relink all that cause team projects has very smart relinquishing linking system and it knows that Ben's last path was this to where his storage is. Speaker 1 40:29 Dave's last path was this, uh, if there are set up the same way as far as logically, not all the names, but if folder structure is similar, it actually reconciles those railings pretty fast. Um, so we don't necessarily rely on a cloud edit, although you could if you wanted to to do it that way. Um, it's just a way to just use creative cloud to make those change instances bounce up and down the cloud. Um, and again, we've got lots of customers using this, especially when you've got talent all around the planet. You might have someone who's in Brazil who's really good with some of this after effects compositing things that it's a very unique look that they have. And you've got an assistant that's going to be putting all this stuff together and then you've got a main editor. And then finally you've got to review and approval. Speaker 1 41:16 You put all those people with different rights and what they're able to do to the project, be able to look at this. It works great. And by the way, that would also work with frame IO. Frame IO was very familiar with how team projects work as well as our, our storage partners. You've certainly got edit share. SNS has a pretty awesome system cue nap if you're in a very small sort of a environment. I think it's, you're not guys do a great job and lots of other, um, storage partners, uh, you know, open drives on the sort of the high end Hollywood side. All of these people are very familiar and share it storage and how to use a team projects. Awesome. So that's great. Team projects is the way we collaborate at long distance. However, there's also, um, shared shared projects, right, which is similar. Great topic. So we're going to take a pause and actually break this show up into two separate episodes because we have a lot more interesting stuff to talk about. Shared projects and all of the other cool stuff. Maybe some road is working on. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. We'll pick back up with this and with Dave humbly of Adobe, and the next episode.

Other Episodes

Episode

October 01, 2015 01:46:18

#30 Do You Have Permission?

  The Workflow Show is back for its fourth season! After a brief hiatus, hosts Nick Gold and Jason Whetstone continue talking about important aspects of the video production technologies industry, but make sure you ask yourself, "Do you have permission?" Have you ever run into an issue where you are trying to edit a project and whatever you try to do to access the files you need on the storage volume, it just isn't cooperating? Most likely, your headaches are being caused by file system permissions! File system permissions are how we assign access rights to files, folders, and applications for specific users and groups of users. They control the ability of the users to view or make changes to the contents of the file system. Permissions play a major role in being able to support editors using shared storage. If you don't have permission to a file or folder on the storage volume, what do you do then? After listening to this episode, you will begin to appreciate that having permission is a pretty good thing, and you might even begin to understand how to untangle the intricate web file of system permissions! Your comments are welcome below, or feel free to email us. View a list of all the episodes of The Workflow Show. The Workflow Show is also available on iTunes. SHOW NOTES Adobe Premiere Pro ...

Listen

Episode

August 13, 2014 01:03:09

#24 A Conversation with Gary Watson of Imation/Nexsan

In this episode Nick Gold and new co-host Jason Whetstone talk with Gary Watson, the co-founder and CTO of Nexsan -- now with the added title of Imation Fellow as  Nexsan was acquired by Imation in 2013. Gary is one of those brilliant technical people who also possesses the gift to communicate eloquently, enthusiastically and informatively with any audience. Listen to this conversation, and you will learn why we at Chesapeake are such fans of Nexsan storage solutions. The topics discussed range from Nexsan's history, philosophy and reputation for "minding the details" to the technical highlights of the popular E-series storage, the new NST series and Assureon, the company's spinning drive-based archive solution. While certainly utilizing SSDs in Nexsan products, Gary also shares with us his candid thoughts about that particular technology and why he believes spinning drives have a very bright future indeed. As with all episodes of The Workflow Show, this program can also be accessed via iTunes. Show Notes ATA SATA ATAbeast review from 2004 SATAbeast review from 2007 E-Series overview active cooling SAS, Near Line SAS and SATA overview good article on how flash works MLC flash memory eMLC Single-Level Cell flash vs. MLC flash core memory ATTO Thunderlink devices NVM Express unified hybrid storage (Nexsan NST series) snapshot replication thin provisioning ...

Listen

Episode

February 08, 2013 00:53:57

#11 "CES Insights with Patrick Roan"

In this episode of The Workflow Show, Nick and Merrel interview tech journalist Patrick Roanhouse (left), of Plan8 Media, who shares his "take-aways" from his tour of the recent 2013 CES (Consumer Electronics Show) held in Las Vegas.     Remember, you can listen and subscribe to The Workflow Show in iTunes Episode length: 53:57 Show Notes: definition of 4K television Sony news about downloadable 4K - Pocket-lint.com news from Japan re: 4K broadcasting next year - The Verge RED Scarlet Sony FS700 camera Sony F65 camera Pioneer Kuro plasma tv sets OLED monitors ProRes 4444 H.265 Moore's Law  Skynet Sony EX1 Sony FS-700UK   Panasonic AG-AF100 "Apple Still Casts a Long Shadow Over CES" - Wired 3D printing explained MakerBot Z Corp 3D printers RepRap - open source 3D printer Catonsville's fabrication lab Baltimore's Digital Harbor Tech Center E3 Expo (by Entertainment Software Association) Google Fiber and Kansas City - Wired crunchyroll.com Aereo television service. View Patrick's many articles and video reports at Plan8 Media  You can also follow him on ...

Listen