#21 "Exploring digital video management and workflow automation" with Danny Gold of Reach Engine

February 13, 2014 01:05:11
#21 "Exploring digital video management and workflow automation" with Danny Gold of Reach Engine
The Workflow Show
#21 "Exploring digital video management and workflow automation" with Danny Gold of Reach Engine
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Show Notes

The Workflow Show
In this episode of The Workflow Show, Nick and Merrel talk at length with Danny Gold, one of the co-founders of Levels Beyond, the company behind the all-encompassing digital media management and workflow automation platform, Reach Engine. The conversation covers how this Denver-based company has grown today to work with some of the largest media entities on the planet. Danny also explains why they have always be wary of having Reach Engine labelled simply "a MAM platform." As a matter of fact, here is a soundbite from a brief interview we did with Danny on that topic at last year's NAB.
  The conversation also includes Danny's insights into the future, where he sees analytics really coming to the fore. Length of podcast episode: 01:05:12 You can also access and subscribe to The Workflow Show on iTunes. Show Notes PAM = Production Asset Management DAM = Digital Asset Management MAM = Media Asset Management service-oriented architecture enterprise service bus Aspera owl.ly Dispatch engandget Sharknado Facebook Paper Flipboard
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Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:01 Welcome to the workflow show episode two Oh five. I'm Meryl Davis alongside my cohost and Nick gold. And this week we have a very special guest, Danny gold, no relation folks. Although Danny and I are often confused for one another, but he's the taller more handsome blonde haired version of myself. No, just kidding. He's we, we practically look like brothers, but Danny, we met a couple of years ago at NAB. Um, he is one of the founders of levels beyond we've mentioned them before on this very podcast. One of the, I'm not going to say at Danny, I'm not going to say ma'am or media asset management, because I know you, you recoil in agony when, when people equate retention with that terminology. And we'll talk about why. And I look forward to getting into that a bit, but as a media management software solution provider fair, that sound we'll stick with it. Speaker 0 00:55 We'll stick with it until a better term pops up in the, in the middle of the show. I'm sure your marketing guys will think of, you know, three totally new things over the next five minutes. So anyway, we were introduced to this. They were actually featured in a booth of one of our existing storage partners at the time. And, you know, we're, we're being presented as a, a piece of software for media management that was really above and beyond a lot of the other stuff out there. You know, we've always had quite a bent toward software that helps people manage their workflows and automated processes and collaboration and all of these things. And we were very impressed. And then I got to know Danny, um, you know, throughout the rest of the show and had some fun, deep, heated conversations about our thoughts and feelings about media management software, which is really does put us in a special category. Speaker 0 01:45 I remember a rooftop screaming match pretty vividly, but, uh, we can skip over that. Well again, no, we both, I think get a little louder when we're excited about things and have opinions, two goals talking about media asset management. This sounds like the beginning of a joke that they walk into a bar. Maybe there's a rabbi. I don't know, but probably, yeah. So, um, but we've had a working relationship with these guys for a couple of years now. It's been fantastic. It, it really has been a great relationship for us, uh, to encounter a bunch of people on, especially on this continent who, who really care about this stuff to the degree that level's beyond us. So Danny, let's start with you. What I know this is maybe a little bit more of a loaded question then than some people might think, but what's your job title there? What do you do, um, that, you know, is all startups. We, we have a slight aversion to, uh, to job titles. Cause I think we all just kind of do what we've got to, to, to get things done. I think my, my most prevalent title has been a head janitor. That's what everybody likes to see is kind of a cleanup guy. That's how you work your way up, man. Yeah, yeah. You gotta start somewhere and uh, you gotta those guys in Speaker 1 02:59 The trenches, but I think my, uh, my, my main position is in technical strategy and solution design, you know, really kind of systems approach looking at not just how our product slots and how does it slot in for kind of the end to end business objectives of a client. And in that I'm always looking at partnerships, you know, what products should we be integrating with? Uh, what companies should we be associated with, which partners should we work with that get it, uh, which is obviously how our relationships developed. And then obviously a lot of that translates to a product strategy as well. Uh, so highly involved with the product team here and have done pretty much every job, uh, in these walls. Since we, we grew from three people to upwards of 40, but, uh, right now, uh, my official job title is something like strategy and solution. So we'll stick with, Speaker 0 03:46 And you were one of the first three year, you are one of the founders of the organization, correct? Speaker 1 03:52 Absolutely. Absolutely. I'm one of the, uh, the OGs here with, uh, art, Raymond, who's our CEO and Dave Lamy, who's our head of architecture and engineering and everything about how to make all these crazy ideas. We all have actually work, which I think is what a lot of our competitors haven't been able to pull off. And we can credit Dave for that here. Speaker 0 04:12 Yeah. A lot of, a lot of software that's out there in the media industry these days, it makes for a snazzy, you know, whiteboard diagram. But when you actually have to roll it out in your, your, your broadcast or, you know, new media company and then have people literally relying on it as the foundational bedrock for every workflow in the organization, you know, sometimes the white board doesn't quite translate. Speaker 1 04:35 It's a, it's a lot of pressure. We'll put it that way being kind of the backend automation system. And like we always say, it's the we're modeling the business flow of an organization. Right. Which is one reason, you know, as you said earlier on damn ma'am, we we've never really fit ourselves in there. It's part of what we do, but we don't like being kind of bucketed or constrained by that because I don't think damn and ma'am solutions have traditionally taken on the business automation aspect, or even trying to model a business. They're kind of worried more about media and files and that's kind of it, we're always saying that that part of it and what our software does is there to serve the business. Right? So you kind of have to understand why media is used in the business, how it's used in the business, how it fits into overall goals. And if you look at it that way, the priorities of the system, and even the, the core workflows sometimes take on a different life than if you just look at it from a very media focus, which is, is really what we're dealing with, but it's not the end goal. It's, it's kind of one of the stops along the way for what the business is trying to do. Speaker 0 05:40 That's a pretty unique and novel approach. And I'm curious, what does that speak to in your own background and the background of the other founders as kind of this motivational principle, let's actually start with the business challenges of who happen to be in this space that yes, obviously involves media and media files and distribution and viewers and all that stuff, but really looking at the business challenge first, what, what are the worlds you guys came from that kind of infused your perspective that way? Speaker 1 06:14 Yeah, it's really interesting. And you know, I have to say that of all of the 40 plus people, um, here at levels beyond every, everybody has contributed in our company has kind of grown and evolved as we've added much more personalities even than myself, Dave and art. But if you look at the Genesis there, it's, it's kind of an interesting intersection and we talk about it a lot. Um, as far as we, we couldn't be three more different people that somehow really like each other and figured out how to work together and have been able to kind of put the best of our strengths in the pool and kind of stir it up. Um, the business aspect we have to give a lot of credit to art for art is definitely the most experienced of, of the three of us. He has held a lot of high level positions, mainly in technology organizations, um, but related to media. Speaker 1 07:01 So he has a publishing background, uh, has worked for a number of, uh, large media outlets, uh, in the magazine space, in the newspaper space. And, uh, right before kind of the start of levels beyond he had a consulting company in technology and automation. So that was what he was really doing, was going into major organizations that he had relationships with and just kind of helping them sort out how technology could be there to help them automate their business, help them track things more efficiently, um, you know, lower error rates and things like that. Dave kind of came in next because they had some shared friends that art was working with that really suggested that the things art was seeing, where he really wanted to create a platform and a product that Dave was the perfect architect to come in there. And Dave and I had already been working together at a, at another company. Speaker 1 07:50 So Dave and I knew each other, uh, David art had some shared friends and they've dragged me along. It's kind of the product guy I'm kind of in between that business and sales side, that art was holding down and the hardcore engineering and architecture side that Dave was taking on, I kind of was the boots on the ground of sifting through that helping figure out what was possible. And the Genesis of our company really kind of had that mixture of that consulting, which we've always brought in. Even we like to say our product hopefully serves that goal where the product in there is kind of helping people get pushed in the right direction and how they should organize their business and automate their business. We had the best engineering talent in the world with Dave and then art just really understood businesses. Um, what effected the bottom line, how ROI comes into play and never let us forget that technology for technology's sake really doesn't go anywhere. Speaker 0 08:40 So, uh, I'm interested to hear more about kind of the early days at levels beyond, you know, you do have a product line that we'll talk more about, but when you guys first B began, what type of projects were you working on? What types of clients were you engaged with? Like many of the people who make pretty high end interesting software packages for this and other industries, were you doing more one off customized projects early on? And that led to what the product line at levels beyond is today, or was the product always first and foremost in your guys' minds are the set of products, I guess I should say. Um, I would say Speaker 1 09:16 We probably have a similar history, but I think we did a couple of things right along the way that have kind of paid off really just in the last 18 months I would say. Um, so when we started out, we always knew we wanted a platform. We talked a lot about a platform in the company in the early days, we didn't kid ourselves thinking that we had this killer app, that we had this killer front end, that we had something that we knew we could take out to all these different verticals, but we knew the core level aspects of how we wanted to attract media and associate metadata to it, having a workflow engine that allowed for plugins and integrations, because there's so many different utilities and systems that come into play. When you're doing these, these heavy, roll-outs having a very scalable platform where we could separate things like search indexes, um, and make sure that we could hit millions and millions of assets, um, and, and upwards of potential, you know, a billion data points we're searching across which we're rapidly approaching with some of our clients. Speaker 1 10:14 So you could think about it as we started with the platform first, um, and went in there. And since our, our kind of first versions of, of reach engine, we've always built on this shared platform. We do not have a unique backend code base at any clients. Even back to the beginning of the company we rolled out right now, we're on reach engine 10. So if you want to look at our history, the platform is more mature. It's going on seven years now, although we've continually evolve that in broken it apart in scale, different aspects of it. And a lot of our new generation of employees, some of our lead architects, like Eric Cobb, who had a lot to do with our new search engine and some of our new utilities coming into play have kind of taken it really a lot farther than Dave art and myself ever imagined. Speaker 1 10:57 Um, and, and it's kind of there's now, but that platform is on version and is, is very solid and stable. And that's really what we've had since the beginning. What we were doing is either ourselves or bringing in a partner or our clients major, major tier one media clients, we're building custom web portals that we're talking to our platform, but the key there is we did the platform first. We didn't go and do a custom one-off build that a client got, they might be building a web portal or a custom front end, but it was all talking to a reach engine backend platform. Um, and we've had that approach since the beginning. And that's still paying off to this day. Like I said, we're on, we're on version 10 of that, Speaker 0 11:34 Danny. So speaking, speaking of a, of your clients early on, when, when you've taken this approach to basically having that uniform and unified platform, not really forking any of the development out to individual clients, uh, can you talk a little bit about some of those early, um, early clients that you got as a result? Speaker 1 11:51 We got a major cable provider in the U S as one of our first clients of this platform and really what we were doing there was moving advertising content. Um, I think today we move something like 6,000 ads a day through reach engine as a backend platform, um, that is still alive and serving all of the ad traffic for that major cable company. We've got a major Greenfield sporting league and ultimate fighting championship. It's been that kinda got us into the, the sports space and we were extremely successful with what we've done for ultimate fighting championship. I think that's been around for years now, and we're always adding there. They're always kind of an early adopter for us. Anytime we have a new cloud technology, or we want to start moving, editing off of, you know, local sand and move it to a data center and stream it out. Speaker 1 12:36 They're always right there with us. And they've been a great early adopter. They've seen, I think some of the payoff of being willing to jump in and try out some new technology. And it's, it's served us both very, very well. And we have a major studio slash television group that we've done long form packaging and delivery for where retake all of their episodic television series, deliver it to iTunes, Hulu, their own iPad app, their own.com. I think we delivered a 75 different over the top VOD outlets. They were one of the early adopters as well for long form packaging. So we kind of started actually with short form ads running through the platform because seven years ago, it was easy to convince people to take that into more of a web based approach and use some cloud technologies to distribute it. And then we started with UFC tackling a much longer form content and then taking that out to studios and networks and getting episodic and long form content in it. Speaker 1 13:27 So we kind of have three that were circled around that were our immediate users of the platform that all kind of have their own web portals, that they've built out, that it solved very specific challenges that their customers interact with. And, um, that it uses mainly as a platform. And then that led us into really hardening the platform and then taking out it into products like studio. And what's great is a client that picks up one of our products. Now that is an application front end, we build is getting that version 10 platform. All of our products are running off of this shared reach engine platform and getting all of this trajectory and history and stability of the platform behind the product they're getting. Speaker 0 14:08 You know, you've just described three kind of very different use cases to being a seminal part of what you guys grew around and the types of needs that your platform caters to platform is, is a great word because it can kind of mean anything. And you clearly are involved in a lot of different places, but this presents a challenge. How do you describe more specifically what your guys' software platform and architecture does when it is clearly involved in so many ends of file-based workflow, you know, across the board from the post production side to farming content out to over the top to more internal type of, you know, media management, workflow processes. I mean, what is this thing? This platform called reach engine, Speaker 1 15:04 Right there there's the million or billion or however many zeros you want to put on it, dollar question. And it's always tough, right? Because we've tried a number of times. Um, and I think we'll continue to try to come up with new terminology and come up with a way to describe this because we are in a different market, right? Um, you have production asset management, you have digital asset management, which was really more traditionally images and print. Then you had media asset management, which was like, Oh, we're video, we're broadcast. We don't use damn we'll, we'll make up our own ma'am. And you have all of these three letter am acronyms that are really promoting this idea of having different silos, which is exactly what we're trying to break down. So if we get a little fevered about being put in that bucket, the idea that you have a Pam or a dam, you know, let's just break down any kind of mid to large company that they have production asset management for working process content, right? Speaker 1 15:54 For all of the raw creative processes and editorial, they have dam, they have digital asset management that their sales, their marketing, their print, their social media team is probably using. And then they've got media asset management. If they're a video company that they're storing their, um, kind of master content in, and they've got all three islands there and chances are, they're not talking to each other, they're not modeling the business. There's not one place that an executive at the company or somebody in marketing or digital media publishing can go to find all of the content that's being created for the organization. That's really what we want to change and where we see reach engine being drastically different. We kind of consider an orchestration hub and database of record for all of the content and all of the data about the content in an organization. One of our different views, because we have this business focus to it, is that the users that log into our application are the business executives are the marketing department, are the sales department. Speaker 1 16:51 That's what gets us excited. Um, you know, clients like ultimate fighting championship have their sales department. That's getting sponsorship logged into the system and marking clips about when a sponsor logo shows up on a piece of content. And if you think about the world of Pam and damn, and ma'am, that's not really a use case that usually bubbles up, right? But if you look at how an organization uses media, it's absolutely a critical use case. So if you think about the reach engine platform, being an orchestration hub, where all media is coming in, where all data is being logged and we're all media is being published out. One of our newest approaches was kind of describing this as like a utility grid where everything's feeding in and you can plug anything into this grid and gonna get powered on to, to reach engine through our API or through our workflows. Speaker 1 17:36 And we kind of break that down between creative, which might traditionally be Pam between inventory. We don't like using archive or library on the marketing side, because we want you to reuse this content over and over again, you know, assets have a real name behind them, right? Go look up the definition of asset. It's something that has value to your organization. So don't just put it away and let it collect dust. This is inventory for you to reuse and monetize and then distribution. So if you take creative inventory and distribution, all three of those are bundled into reach engine. Our workflows serve all three of those and every user of an organization should have a log into reach engine to be able to, uh, be a part and engage in those processes. So we kind of look at it from that, you know, media orchestration hub from a video operating system. These are all words that we've thrown around for years. That don't mean anything to anybody, but the idea is we have a different spin and we want people to look at it differently. Speaker 0 18:27 So there's like a front end. There's the thing that people are interacting with, which there may be multiple modalities for, as you kind of referenced. Some people may even kind of skin it themselves and create their own front end, end user experience. And then there's the backend platform, right? And I've heard you, I'm kind of from a very kind of software engineering perspective, refer to the backend technology is kind of being a service oriented architecture and enterprise service bus. Can you kind of flesh out that terminology a little bit, again, that maybe speak to the scalability of the platform? You know, we've run into a few things over the years with various software vendors we work with, right? They've either started as literal desktop applications. And over the years tried to glom on more and more capabilities so that they can serve even smaller work groups or, you know, enterprises. Speaker 0 19:22 They may say that they do this very effectively, but the reality is because of some of the actual software underpinnings, we can run into scalability issues. Likewise, we've encountered pieces of software that are very pie in the sky, very backend, all of these like highly automated scalable platforms, but, you know, they almost don't have a front end at all and become meaningless to people who actually have to interact with it. You guys seem to kind of be approaching it from both ends simultaneously. Can you speak a little bit more about those different sides of the solutions that you guys craft and what makes them unique, usable to the different types of users and use cases you've been talking about and what can make them appropriate both potentially at a smaller work group level, but also at a massive enterprise level, which obviously a number of your clients are doing. Absolutely. And I think, Speaker 1 20:15 I think you kind of laid out the two sides of, you know, the competition in the industry. Um, you know, very well there. I think we came at it from the enterprise side and, um, it might just be because we survived and we've got a good platform that we got to the productized front end, right? I mean, for the first four years of the company, we really hadn't cracked what that front end turnkey application. It was always on our radar, right. I mean, we did the platform probably about two years in. We started saying, you know, there's gotta be common use cases here. There's gotta be a way to build an application. That's flexible enough, but packages enough functionality out of the box. Um, and I'd say we're still on that trajectory. I think studio reach engine studio, which is our kind of application, that's a perfect blend of that enterprise scale with that usable web based front end that does a lot for an organization and is kind of our bread and butter product right now. Speaker 1 21:10 We've tried to blend that we're getting there. And, and, you know, I said the platforms on version 10 studios on version one dot six now. And so, you know, we, we have, we have a lot more that we're going to do with that product. We're definitely not done with it. Uh, probably won't be for a long time, but I think we've captured the essence there. So we started with that enterprise scale. Our clients were already moving huge volumes of content and needing to search across it. So we started from the enterprise side and then really built the turnkey application years later, as we had enough use cases. And we kind of saw through the matrix and, and had this vision of how we could create a front end that was interacting with the platform and highly flexible there, the backend architecture that you're kind of asking about, you know, service oriented enterprise service bus don't mean a lot in the media space. Speaker 1 21:56 The key here is that components of reach engine, like our search engine are separated. This isn't a top down monolithic piece of software. We've put a lot into our search engine, but that's a separate service, right? That's something separate. We have our own query language that runs through an API there, and we can move that off to another server. What that gets us moving forward is that can be moved off to the cloud. And that's really where enterprise architecture for us in service oriented approaches is paying off. Isn't actually scaling onsite. We have clients that run 10 servers, right? We're, we're scalable because we can break down based on the profile. Do you have more users searching or you already more ingests we'll convert images and thumbnails on two servers here, we'll use these two servers for search. We'll put the database on this server. Speaker 1 22:38 We'll put our workflow engine on this server. We can break those apart and have those run on different, different hardware setups. But what we're doing now, what 2014 is for us, which we started in 2013, but 2014 will be the year for us is taking those components and moving to the cloud. You'll have a workflow engine on site because it needs access to your sand needs, access to your encoders. But you may be logging into a portal where the search is happening on the cloud, where all of your proxies are stream from the cloud and where your packaging and distribution happens by a single representative asset being moved to the cloud service and then use cloud based in coding and packaging to get it to the a hundred formats you want to deliver. Um, and that's where that approach really scales because you can scale on site, but not everybody can afford a million dollars in hardware to, to bundle a massive 80 and coder farm with, you know, 10 search nodes and what a, what a large studio might be able to pull off for a smaller client. Speaker 1 23:36 They might want a single kind of appliance based approach to attach to their content, but have everything else in a multisite way happen in the cloud. And that's really what our, what our engineering focuses around now is taking our services and breaking them apart to a, a cloud kind of local node cloud hybrid model. And Danny, can you talk a little bit about what that workflow kind of looks like from, from a review and approve from a dispatch perspective, you know, what do you envision levels clients utilizing the cloud pieces for? So like what can fully in summarily been moved off from, from a local configuration right into the cloud? Well, um, you, you hit on one of the first ones, right? Which is the easiest for everyone to understand, which is that, you know, your producers, your executives, your clients probably aren't VPN into your office or on your sand. Speaker 1 24:23 And can't just go pull up a piece of content right there on an iPad. They're on an iPhone, they're remote somewhere. And what you really want to do is leverage the cloud. So somebody submits a, a project, you know, an edit, um, want to render the sequence down to a small H two 64 format, which could happen on site and then upload that to a cloud service that has a mobile compatible front end. So somebody gets a notification, they click a link, it pulls up the streams, the content from the cloud to their device, wherever they are, that link has an expiration time. So, you know, after they view it, it's only good for 12 hours, 24 hours, it might be watermarked it's secure. They comment on it, Mark it back, send a notification, which gets all the way back to the onsite note and comments get attached to the product or the sequence or the asset that was sent out. Speaker 1 25:10 That's, that's the easy to understand model. Probably our biggest push, um, in the first half of this year for the cloud is multi-site so many of our clients have multisite installs where they have groups of remote workers that they're pushing off this age of having everybody in an office building and running fiber through the floor and getting everybody attached is not, uh, where we really see things moving right now. Things like Adobe anywhere are allowing new forms of remote users to participate. But even multisite you take any organization, and they've probably got a small office somewhere, a number of users, and what we're doing is actually synchronizing all of the proxies that our web interface would use centralizing the data store and making it so that when you log into reach engine, all of that is happening off of a centralized cloud domain that you're seeing all of the assets from all of the sites. Speaker 1 26:04 You could say, Hey, this assets in LA and the workflow is contextual to say, if you want it to right click and push that into your project, it's going to do in Aspera transform, or it might just do a, an FTP transfer to get it to you, to where you're sitting so that you can work with it or better yet anywhere. It just associates it to a production, no need to move media. A multisite is huge because you have a single place to search a single place to view all the assets for an organization and see what's going on. And the clouds are perfect technology for that. Cause you're not trying to move the higher as media that can live in any of the sites. And you can just have a small reach engine node at that site connected to that storage connected to that LTO, whatever it might be. Um, but basically the D the reach engine database, the reach engine search index and the reach engine application are all hosted in centralized. So everybody's getting the same view. Speaker 0 26:50 And you're talking about being able to kick off from this simplified, you know, cloud oriented, potentially tablet or iPhone or Android compatible interface. These workflows that are just literal orders of magnitude more complex than traditional broadcast ingest postproduction distribution workflows, but literally give users a push button kind of simplicity to that. That is in turn triggering inordinate amounts of potentially complex automated actions across sites that could literally be across the planet. Speaker 1 27:28 So let's get, I'll give a quick example, which sounds so simple when we say it. Um, and it, it makes for a powerful demo. We actually truly built this as demo where for what our workflow engine could do, and now we have clients using it for, for their day jobs. Take the example of your in kind of social media marketing or digital media publishing, whatever this, this role is, where you're in charge of, of taking some promo material, some highlight material, and just getting it out to social media, right? What what's YouTube great for YouTube is a great promotional vehicle. Your, your high Rez episodic content is probably not going there, but you probably want to promote to the audience there. So take this role of somebody who traditionally does not have access to the asset management system. Let's keep that in mind, right? Usually this person would have to send a request into edit and say, Hey, I want this clip. Speaker 1 28:14 And could you do a quick cut here and give it to me in this format? And then I'll manually upload that to YouTube and disseminate it in our world. That looks like wherever that person is, they pull up the web browser, they go through and search for media. That's filtered by who they are, what their role is, what types of content. So maybe they can only see finished material that's been approved for the web by illegal clearing department. So let's just assume that's already done that. Set our securities, filtered them a scroll through, find your piece of content. Maybe I just want to clip out a 22nd highlight. So from their browser, they set an in and out point, basically create a new sub clip in their browser. Um, then they right click that and they say published a YouTube. That right click option is loading a set of what reach engine workflows have been set up and configured and are accessible based on this user role. Speaker 1 29:01 So we have all of this very contextual, but this is where we're launching a workflow. Um, our workflows can request user input. So it's going to pop up a form and say, which one of our YouTube channels, which is going to be a dropdown of eight YouTube channels we run. Do we want to publish to what's the name of the clip? And what's a, basically a social media posts that you want to make to promote this clip. So it's going to ask you for three pieces of information driven by our workflow engine, they click submit, and now the magic happens, right? That user never knew where that file was. They don't know what format that's in. They don't know or care. They wanted to get a 22nd slice out to YouTube, um, reach, engine's going to go do the tracking to say, where does that media, it's going to send a request to the node that's attached to that storage. Speaker 1 29:45 Let's take an extreme example. It's on LTO. We're going to trigger a restore, potentially a partial file restore of that asset. We're going to pass it to an encoder to get a YouTube compatible format. We're going to upload it to YouTube and store the URL back as metadata. So we can always know that this was published and here's where it lives on YouTube. We're going to push metadata to YouTube about it, that reach engine already had. Then we're going to get back that YouTube URL and construct a tweet with what the user, um, entered. We're going to post that on Twitter with a link to the YouTube URL, and then we're done, um, that's, you know, seven or eight automated steps that somebody didn't have to do. They clicked the form three fields and they go, and that's kind of the power of the automation of letting reach engine track, all the nitty gritty details and bolt on all the components. Speaker 1 30:31 So you can do a right click publish to YouTube. That's just one example. There are many, many more, but that's the kind of automation that we build into the platform. You know, it's funny as you're describing this, the thing that I was thinking about is how there, there are social media tools that sort of have the same kind of precepts when it comes to, uh, being all encompassing. Uh, you know, like there's a, I think it's hourly is probably the Twitter <inaudible> as an SEO tool, but it's sort of like a, an open dashboard, if you will, where you can do all these things all at once. And I envisioned when you describe these things, something very similar, only it's, it's oriented around very specific business needs of media organizations. Uh, you know, it sounds like you really have a dashboard to do it all, or at least the, the underpinnings to really develop a very specific workflows specific to your, your organization. Speaker 1 31:22 And could you talk a little bit about what it takes really to identify very specific workflows within an organization, maybe some challenges that in your travels, uh, I know Nick and I, we certainly have those challenges when they relate to other products. What is really helpful when identifying the key pieces to move forward? Yeah, I think that's, that's probably the area that we're still focused the most on. Right? Um, we've built this, this tool and this orchestration hub, like you said, it's kind of the one-stop for media, right? We want you to be able to find all your media, their search is really important and then make all that media actionable workflows are really important, right? And if I had to boil it down, there's a lot more of the platform does, but it gives you that web based dashboard for instant search across all your media, and then the contextual actions that you can take on the media and we're done everything else is, is kind of the details in there. Speaker 1 32:11 But that's the focus building what those contextual actions are, has always been a big challenge in this space. What we have found just from banging our heads against the wall for the last seven years building. This is we we've seen a lot more commonality than I think a lot people, a lot of people give the industry credit for. Um, if you look at it, everybody's bringing in media and wants a, a set of metadata as a gatekeeper, so that all your content is searchable based on five or six tags, right? So that's kind of step one is building your import workflows. How are our users going to gesture to get content into the system? Where are you going to request of them so that you've got data integrity in your archive. We always start there. Then you've always got some kind of review and approve categorization of content, whether it's approved or it's waiting approval, kind of the job management of, you know, we're working on a job and we've kind of modeled that in our system where you create a collection and then you've got media in it. Speaker 1 33:02 And that collection has job data around it. And you're tracking the status of that and projects are going in and out. Um, and then you're doing some kind of delivery of that content. So you can kind of break it down. And what's interesting is across sports, across broadcast, across publishing, across, um, institutions and kind of government organizations and across retail and brands and retail and brands is one of our biggest focus areas because there's so much media being created out of those organizations. Um, and you can really be prescriptive when you go in there because they don't have 20 years of being a broadcast agency to get into. We find a lot more commonality in that the nomenclature changes what they call their fields changes, but they want that right click menu option to say changes. But the core components, we're finding a lot of reuse too. Speaker 1 33:45 And so what we do going in now is what we, we kind of spec out what we call templates workflows. We are not arrogant enough to say that we can bundle a full set of workflows that will work for everybody in the world. That's also the power of our platform is that you can tweak these things. You can dial them into your organization and your business. We want to get as close to that turnkey as we can. But where we're at right now is we usually start with about 10 workflows and we push it on the organization that say, here's 10 workflows that we, everybody starts with. It's a, it's, you know, three import workflows, it's four or five batch update, metadata, move it between different, um, users. And assignees in the organization and it's three or four package and delivery kind of workflows to get content out. Speaker 1 34:28 We have those, here's the questions we asked, what metadata fields do you want? What categories do you want to use? What role, what do you call your user roles who are going to get these notifications? And we start with that. What we always try to do is bite off a phase one that is usually something new. Um, what we found is tackling the legacy archive is, is very challenging from a data transformation from mix-match media formats. It's important. Uh, we, we try to never get that globbed up in a phase, one approach. We want to set you up for how new media is going to come in and flow out of the organization. Get that stood up, get a, get a win on our hands, get people excited about it. And that kind of boxes in what questions we ask, what storage are you using? Speaker 1 35:08 What's your archive? What encoder do you want to use? And we're even trying to get more and more prescriptive about saying, this is what you should use. And like I said, in some of the Greenfield areas like retails and brands, you can do that because they don't necessarily have a lot of infrastructure to date. Um, but I think it comes around to templating, you know, bringing kind of that consulting attitude we have, uh, here's what other organizations are doing. Here's 10 workflows to start out with. We're starting out with new media coming in and new media going out. And then we'll phase out bringing in the legacy archives and cleaning up the data because people can get mired in those details. And they're really important, but we all know that the key to this is adoption in the organization. So you've got to get a short win on your hands. Speaker 1 35:50 That's the one thing I would say. And, and for all of us here on the call, we are those guys that can just go down the rabbit holes in the details, and we have to kind of stop ourselves because we know all of these things so well, but I think we're very successful when we start out with identifying a new problem, bringing it in, getting a win, getting people excited about what it can do, getting all kinds of new users in tune with it, gathering that feedback, and then setting yourself up for the, the longer project, you know, maybe bringing in the archive, bringing on, on, uh, different groups in the organization. So just bite it off, you know, one, one chunk at a time. Speaker 0 36:26 Now, Meryl earlier mentioned a term that you guys have used. It's a, I guess, a sub brand, if you will dispatch, and we've talked about reach engine studio kind of on the premises. Um, we've talked about the cloud element. That's that's formulating tell me a little bit more about this thing that you guys have described as dispatch in the past and its role in the very complex and growingly complex exponentially delivery scenario that people face these days. I mean, one of the things that I think is so interesting now, it's certainly interesting for those of us who love geeking out on this subject that I think our listeners know that the three of us certainly do, but you know, we have this world where you, if you read in gadget every day, you learn about like five whole new types of platforms that are arising just to consume digital media. Speaker 0 37:19 You've got whole new websites, whole new social networks, whole new set, top boxes, whole new consumer electronics categories, next generation video game platforms, next generation, you know, mobile systems. And these things are just like the rabbits man. They're just like coming out of nowhere. And it used to be in broadcast, you know, about a decade ago that if you could like spit a signal into your transmitter, you were pretty much set, right? I mean, box and ship a tape. I don't want to belittle it too much. Cause there's obviously a lot of potential complexity in traditional broadcast and signal oriented workflows and distribution. But the reality is it was like black boxes and some signals. And now you've got this, I mean just multiplicity of delivery and delivery means a couple of things, right? It's not only the format of the actual media you're trying to deliver and how you're getting it to whatever that place is that it's delivered from. Speaker 0 38:18 But it's, we've been talking a lot about metadata. There's often a lot of metadata that has to travel along with the file to populate someone else's system that may be is, you know, a cable providers, digital, you know, on demand system that a customer uses to actually the names of the programs and when they're on TV or are they available on the video on demand component or whatever. I mean, dispatch, you guys have talked about as being a tool to simplify some of that. Let's talk about that delivery side and where you guys are at with that process now. So I think if you look, if you kind of rewind Speaker 1 38:53 You, you know, how we were talking about the early days, right? Reach engine was first used for distribution. I was first used for distribution for advertising. It still is. We run a very, very large percentage of the advertising that is delivered in the U S in North America right now. So you could actually kind of think about it as being our roots, which I think is a, is a big differentiator. Um, and probably why we still push back against the digital asset management ma'am terms, right? Is that we always have this distribution focus. We always have this end goal focus. And I think if you, if you ask us internally, we probably didn't think that studio would be the main application that we would start with. I think we kind of learned along the way of building our platform, that before we could nail distribution, we had to help the creative process and help the inventory and help the searchability and organization of content. Speaker 1 39:51 I don't know that that six years ago we thought that that would be our focus six years later. Um, and products like studio would be mainly solving that, right. That's kind of, we had to go clean that mess up because when we tried to do automated delivery and distribution people weren't ready for it. You know, people didn't have their content organized and searchable and, and with the right metadata and the right access and the right visibility and in the right locations. So reach and kind of stepped backwards and said, let's fix this and then let's fix distribution. Um, but if you look at, you know, we're kind of calling dispatch and where I think that set of technology is going, it's almost back to our root it's almost back to what our focus has really been, which is on getting more content out, you know, reaching into the inventory, which is being populated and managed by studio and then packaging and delivering it and repurposing it. Speaker 1 40:39 And it's a really, it's a core expertise of this organization. And the people here we've lived through getting some of the first television shows to the iPad, into the, into Hulu, into Roku, into all these different outlets. Um, we really understand distribution and packaging and these new burdens that have been put on our organization and, and, and media organizations in the number of devices that have proliferated, like you said, the standards still haven't come around. We don't know when they will. So the reality today is you have to capture the right metadata throughout a process. You need a consistent inventory of content, meaning, you know, what the formats are in there. You know, what your audio channel layout is. You have all this information about it, and then distribution can break that apart, package it in code it to different formats, rewrap it transcode the metadata, remap, your audio channels, and a file transfer and renaming and delivery to an outlet. Speaker 1 41:36 And we have all of that in our workflow engine, in our packaging model, because we do that for some of the largest organizations. And what we want to do is bring that to anybody that's running studio. Um, and I think it's probably gonna come out as a cloud service. I think dispatch for us, which is an onsite packaging and delivery that some of our clients are using. I think the way that that's going to hit the mass market of media organizations is allowing package and delivery as a cloud service, where studio, when you finish your content, you can just log into studio and say, I need to kick that out to Hulu and iTunes and Netflix and my own.com. And it uploads kind of this delivery mezzanine file to our cloud service. And it gets rewrapped repackaged, repurposed and published across all of those outlets. That's what we want to do for all these organizations. That's why asset management in itself is not the end goal, right? You created this content for a reason. It's got to get to the audience and we think reach engine should bring it to that audience, or at least bring it to that last mile to get to the audience, Speaker 0 42:34 Relating it, to getting the content and looking at the content as monetizing inventory, I think is just sets you guys very apart from frankly, most other technology companies in the media space that I've ever worked with, or even have heard about. And so you guys are thinking about this, the real ROI of making an investment in these complex, potentially sophisticated workflow, changing, you know, software platforms that can really energize an organization and open up a lot of opportunity. But at the same time requires a lot of commitment in terms of energy personnel, just planning, thinking things through, and the level of detail that I think, you know, many organizations can kind of be challenged with from a change management perspective. I'd be curious to know how do you guys find that crafting an ROI story tends to unfold as you are talking to a client and getting them to really think about what are the options that you're actually enabling so that this is not just an investment to sink money into a piece of technology for no good reason, because it's solving one or two little challenges, but this is going to enable you to grow, you know, make more money, hit, more customers, hit more platforms, sell more advertising, whatever your personal, you know, business plan is. Speaker 1 44:06 And what we do is kind of find a few thought leaders, early adopters, people that we could do, case studies and, and promote, and, and really are, have already kind of made that, that mindset switch that you're talking about, they're ready for this, right? They know that they need to do this. We grabbed those guys, work tirelessly, get it done. And then you can take it out into the industry. You can take it out to peers and say, no, this has been successful. We're not just making this up, right. This is how many deliveries you're able to do with this much staff. This is how much, how many assets you can move through, right? These are the different outlets you can publish to now. So you kind of have to show two to go wider in an industry. You kind of have to show people that have already done it, um, and get real data behind it. Speaker 1 44:51 And what we do is we just try to get those pilot accounts, nail it out, and then have the data backing it when you're an automation platform. Uh, it's really easy to just get mired in the cost savings approach, which is a huge part of the equation. What we like to do with that is say, no, here's how you can unlock additional revenue streams with the same staff you have. So it's increasing the capacity of your organization, where you're not having to hire. If you think about it, you know, when you're coming at it from the distribution end a Roku, I want to Hulu channel. I want, I want to promote on YouTube with a subscriber channel. If I'm sitting in a media ops department, I'm sweating when an executive comes in to say that, because it's like, how many people are you going to give me? Speaker 1 45:32 Do I get somebody to manage each one of those outlets? And what we can say is we can sit down with the, with the business owners here and say, no, we can give you these additional outlets, you know, training your existing staff, using existing staff. So the spend is, is marginalized in that. And it's not, we're going to go in and do cost savings. It's no we're going to increase your throughput with the same staff you have. And then we're doing that through automation, through the workflow engine. And it's really powerful when you can come in and say, here's three other peers in your same space that have done it. Here's how much they're doing with three people on staff. And that's where that effort that you're talking about. We try to expand that with our pilot customers so that we can go through and kind of bring that out through the rest of the industry and make much stronger recommendations. We always say, you know, be prescriptive when we go in there, here's what three of the major brands are doing for their media publishing. Here's the workflows we'll talk through, what's unique to your business, but we've already done this before, you know, kind of trust us. Speaker 0 46:32 The landscape is changing so much and so rapidly as we've been talking about. And we've, we've talked about how some of that relates to your guys' technologies and embracing the cloud, at least for things that as of today, it makes sense for, we've talked about just obviously the diversification and growing number of delivery platforms for rich media tie, your guys' solution into this larger planetary level of technology change. And I'm just curious, you guys are some of the brighter guys I know in this industry, frankly, that's obvious, I think for most of our listeners right now, and I'm just curious, things are changing so much. I think people just have this feeling like they don't know what's going to happen. You know, not even three or six months from now, as far as new things, they're going to be asked to deliver for some new platform, that's come up out of nowhere, much less, two, three, five years from now. Speaker 0 47:31 You guys spend a lot of time thinking about this. You find yourselves in a lot of very interesting spaces with a number of different types of companies, large and small, new media, old media, you know, everything in between. I'm curious, just from a larger perspective, how you see like now through the end of the decade, changing for a lot of media users, media corporations, just that the rapidly changing state of media and how you guys are planning your own sets of technologies to kind of be in line with some of those larger overarching shifts that are taking place. Speaker 1 48:08 So I think first one recommendation I would put out there because you're exactly right on, on things are changing and it can be paralyzing, right? People can say, well, I don't even know what I want to do right now because it's going to change six months in a year later. Um, if you haven't done it already, you have to start by getting a database of record for all of your content, collecting critical data around it and getting a searchable inventory. Let me just put that out there. It doesn't matter how you want to use your content or how you want to produce new content, but be prepped to be able to organize and find what you have and have immediate access to it because you're not going to be able to take advantage of anything. If you can't get at your content and you're not prepped for automation, even if you're not automating, even if you're not doing that in reach engine, start getting it organized. Speaker 1 48:55 Don't let it sit on tapes. Don't let it sit on external drives. You know, don't let a spreadsheet manage your media, get it organized. That's step one, you have your processes for how content comes in, how it's tagged, how it's set up, what your data structures are, what your hierarchy, you know, we always talk about taxonomies and these things put some thought process to it. And if you're big enough, hire an archivist or a librarian, that will be your biggest ROI down the road. So that's my rant. My I'll get off the soap box, but if you take anything away, please start there. That's the most powerful thing I think you can do. Now, let's talk about why that's important. Um, I think one of the biggest things we're going to see, and I'm not alone in this, and I'm not brilliant enough to have made it up, but it's something that we're tracking. Speaker 1 49:38 And that I think that our platform will be highly involved with. Let's talk about analytics for a minute, right? Um, analytics are something that I feel like have never played in asset management projects, or at least to the level that you might expect it. If you sit back and you take a real view of media of I create media and I inventory and track that media and I deliver it well, if anybody is smart enough to even take a step back further as a business owner, they're going to say this whole conversation is missed a key part, which is how did people respond to that content? What were the analytics that I actually get revenue out of it? I created this much media. How much of it did people care about? Right. There's a missing gap even into the equation that reach engine delivers today, that we're going to be focused on addressing that. Speaker 1 50:25 We're going to be focusing on partnering with the right people. You can do so much more. You can do analytics are so much more powerful in a digital world where we can get them in real time where we can, um, read them from these over the top outlets. And we're not reliant around, you know, this 30 day report or all this traditional set, top box analytics. Even the set top boxes now are digitally connected and we can get more viewership data right away. If you have this centralized inventory of content, if you think about it, that's the last place that your assets exist as kind of one master piece of content, then they're fragmented and delivered and chopped up and diced up and republished. And they go all out over the world. That hub is where you want to bring back your analytics. You don't want analytics to come across somebody's desk in a report and, you know, read that and say, okay, did okay. Speaker 1 51:15 It did. Okay here. Now I'm going to make really critical business decisions that feed back into creative, but they're never associated to the creative content. They're never associated to that database of record. I have not seen anybody really do that. I've heard a lot of talk about it, but I haven't seen anybody really do that to the level that we want to, where you can track that back. When you're looking in reach engine at a piece of content, I'll, I'll even take regions into the equation. When you're looking in your asset management system, here's how it ran here were ratings on it. Here's how here's reports on the amount of content I created, which outlet did better. Right? We can feed that into our prioritization of our, of our distribution and publishing of making sure that it gets out to the outlets, work performs better, sending more media, sending exclusives there. Speaker 1 51:59 I'm sending, you know, identifying types of content and how it will perform. Um, one of the things we talk about our CEO art, uh, talks about this endlessly predictive analytics, right? This idea of how can we, when we get this continent here, maybe even predict how it would run or more importantly, where it will run best based on where audiences are engaging or where things are trending. How can we suggest that you should promote this content on this outlet? Because people love, you know, that sports enthusiast, um, is on Vimeo versus YouTube. We don't know what those are, but when we have analytics in, then our systems can be even more intelligent about how we create content, how we package that content and how we dice up and deliver and where we deliver that content. I think you're going to see based on our viewing habits, we want more targeted content. Speaker 1 52:48 We want our own channel, right? I just want to, I still like to kick back and turn on the TV, but I want it to program itself. And that's what we're missing now is when you're on a Netflix or an Amazon, we're getting suggestions, we're getting genres, we're getting, you know, these kind of, um, categories and it's getting closer there, but I want content to be programmed to me. And to do that, you have to have analytics and organization and tagging fed back into the content system of record. I think that's going to be a huge focus for the rest of the decade is how we tie analytics and velvets. So basically you want to be responsible for the next shark NATO. Absolutely. I want to be responsible for at least, you know, getting the revenue off all the viewership. Speaker 0 53:27 But I mean, I, I say this only half ingest, and it's funny to be talking about a lot of these, uh, you know, highfalutin, you know, long view, you know, aspects of the, the changing media landscape, but Netflix used analytics and looked at, you know, a number of categories that looked disparate. Like they had nothing to do with one another and their, their viewer habits and said, you know what, we're going to make a bet on this. If we combine, you know, the action nature, thriller adventure movie with something about sharks, we think this percentage of our audience is going to view it. And I mean, that's an extraordinarily, you know, just majorly extreme way of dealing with analytics and having it feed into your content and how you're disseminating it. But what we really just want Pandora for television is what we're getting. Speaker 1 54:17 Yeah. Yup. I, and I think that, like you said, Netflix still Netflix probably has a better database, right? They always have had these competitions for breaking a vagina is in the suggestion engine. They've put more time into this than almost anybody, but it's still hot. It's still come out in a couple shows, right? It's still not as far along as you'd think. And what happens when I'm a retailer and I want to sell a product and the system suggests to me that you should sponsor this show on this outlet and that's the best way to target your audience, right? That's the kind of things that we're kind of talking about is tying it, not even just to our Netflix viewing, which is what we want, right. Selfishly we do want that Pandora. We need the a, was that the music genome project. We need to create the video genome project. Speaker 1 55:02 And that's exactly what we need to go after. But tying that into how does that serve all of these different organizations of, you know, you're a, you're a sports fan and you've got your favorite and you've got your fantasy team and it's feeding you that video update at night. That's spliced highlights of just your players, right. You know, and that's kind of a custom thing. Every is getting their own highlight slice. You've got to have analytics, you have to have user data and you have to have your entire highlight archive tagged in a way to serve that. You know, Speaker 0 55:32 It's amazing, right. A decade ago, we, when we talked about a channel, it was this fixed point, you know, at the time, okay. Maybe there were still 50 or 110 years ago, but you know, I, Hey, go back a little more and it was three or four channels on your TV. And it was a fixed set of content. Okay. Maybe there was a little bit of geography involved in determining, you know, um, which ads might go out to which large metropolitan regions, but it was this very one to many type thing. And it was many of us kind of, you know, sipping from the same straw. And you're literally painting a picture. Now we're channels are becoming these literally self evolving, analytically driven, completely personalized experiences, potentially for the viewer that has this conglomeration of rich content, advertising, content, analytics, metadata, and they're all feeding back into themselves. And it's this thing that's literally almost a live in a sense, and growing and evolving and has kind of taken on its own volition. And we each have our own at all times, right? It's our personal metadata. The difference is that a it's not on our cell phones yet, but, uh, you know, that just imagine there will be a time in which somebody will be profiled based on their intricate personal video channels and their telephone calls and their geolocation all as a result of these analytics. Speaker 1 57:06 Yup. And think about it. I mean, you know, the I'll take it one step further since you asked about the future is, you know, that personalized channel, like I said, I think that the perfect blend is allowing users to still kick back and binge-watch, or just, you know, I've got an hour and a half and I just want to turn it on. Right. That, that what television has always been good at, sometimes we're all frustrated. How many times have you sat down with somebody to watch TV and you spend an hour looking through the Netflix queue and arguing about what you want to watch. You don't watch anything, you know, it's like, we want to get rid of that. Let's, let's take that out. That's not, that might be fun for some people it's not always fun. Cause then you're frustrated. You can't agree on anything it's like, you still want to, we just ended up launching what my wife wants to watch. Speaker 1 57:44 That's the answer, that's the right answer, sir. Um, wise, man. Um, but you know, we still want to kick back and kind of just have it be entertained. I want to sit back and be entertained. That's what television is for. Um, but what if it low, I always have this view. Um, and, and I actually wrote a draft of this years ago about a project we wanted to do and maybe we'll dust this off and it'll be the next big reach engine application is you're watching that channel. And there also is an overlaid CNN style, ticker. That's showing you local news updates, as you said, geo programmed, right? It's showing you maybe check-ins of your friends, Hey, your friend is within three miles of you at the bar. You might want to get off the couch and go meet him. Um, this idea of take that, that old, you know, my mom sits there and I think the CNN ticker is burned into her screen, right? Speaker 1 58:32 So I always have this view of that CNN ticker. That's a great thing because I can be entertained. Some people might, I might not find CNN content entertainment. It can be entertained and get, you know, these relevant updates going across, which is something you don't get. If you're just binge watching a show between episodes overlayed at critical point in episodes, maybe were a commercial break, would have been show me relevant things to my life as well. And still give me that kick back, be entertained, have the news angle to it. I think that's what, what television can really be. Speaker 0 59:00 Well, look at what Microsoft is doing with Xbox one, right? Where you can feed it. The HTMI, you know, video signal just coming off of your cable or satellite box. And they want to help to craft that peripheral, you know, environment that you're talking about and start to feed in more of those interactive services, those personalized services, those community and social types of services right there on top. And I, and I'm with you. And I think for a while now, a lot of us have seen that apps are kind of the new channels, right? Except that they're not these static things where we all have the same experience. It's highly personalized. It's interesting to relate this to the new mobile app that Facebook just released a few days ago called paper, which is a whole it's Facebook on the backend, but a completely new interface for getting the content it's been compared to, uh, the mobile app Flipboard, which kind of, Speaker 1 59:59 Which is one of my favorite new experiences. I am a Flipboard attic. I will put that out there. And that's what I want to do for video, Speaker 0 00:06 Fascinating that, you know, Facebook and a lot of these major media technology companies now, and, and, you know, I like to remind people, companies like Facebook and Twitter, aren't really tech companies. They're they're media companies and, you know, yeah. They use technology, but the media industry has pretty much always used various forms of technology back to the printing press. So, you know, when you look at them as media entities and wanting to craft these unique channel experiences for each and every viewer, it does seem to be where things are going. So let's, let's tie that back down to kind of today, I'm a media user. You've, we've talked about different types of organizations, different sizes of organizations, different challenges that people may have different places where they may be, you know, in their own evolution of managing their media and figuring out how it's going to get out there and how are we monetizing it? Speaker 0 00:56 And how do we come to think of our content more as our salad bowl inventory, right? Lots of different folks out there coming from a lot of different angles. You guys levels beyond us, your trusted, friendly integration and reseller partner at Chesapeake systems. How would you say to a media user, one of our listeners right now that they might self identify as someone who needs to learn more about what you guys have on offer? Could they be a potential levels beyond reach engine type of customer? You know, how are you answering that for people who come to you and say, Hey, I have a lot of problems with media management and dissemination. Why are you guys the right fit? Speaker 1 01:37 I think, um, you know, in short, if you're already at a place where you've got enough users that you're, you have shared storage, or you're looking at shared storage, right, that's kind of still a key component to this, and you've got enough content where you have multiple touch points in the organization, even if it's just, even if you're a 10 user organization that might be pushing out enough content where, you know, you want people to be able to push a finished project in retrieve that in the future, take a rendered version of that and publish it out to social media or your own site. If you've got a few users that are pushing content in and pulling content out, and you want to make sure from this day forward, that your content is organized and tagged consistently, and that you can automate every use of that content downstream after you created. Speaker 1 02:23 That's where we come into play, we'll continue to expand our focus and our attention to every user that's creating media. I think as we have cloud services and we might have pure cloud services coming down the pike, then we've really got a play where small, small organizations can use it. But right now, if you're at an organization where you've got shared storage, that's kind of your first litmus test and you've got a number of touch points coming in and out, it's worth talking to us, um, and, and go to <inaudible> dot com. If you're an Adobe user, we've got great, great solutions for you. If you're a final cut, we do as well. And we've just got great partnerships with Adobe, anywhere with premiere, with prelude, for tagging, where that ecosystem approach is seamless with reach engine, you can check that out at retention.com/adobe. Uh, if you're Adobe user, you're thinking about going that way and see some great diagrams and examples of what our integration looks like. And regardless, you know, give us a shout, talk to us chat, and we can figure out very, very quickly, um, whether it's a fit or not. Speaker 0 03:22 Well, I couldn't have ended it any better than that right there. Yeah. We were going to draft it up. We were going to ask you where people could go to learn more, but it's like, you're a consummate professional here. Listen, I mean, this has been, I love these conversations. It's, it's always a pleasure to chat because as I said, you guys approach this from a different point of view, a very holistic point of view, which is something that I think we ourselves and why our organizations have meshed so well that we take these big picture, you know, looks at things, but at the same time related to the, on the ground issues that people are wrestling with and I get just my creative juices flowing. It's funny. It's like a lot of us here at Chesapeake we've come from various kind of quasi creative industries. Speaker 0 04:05 But the way that we really are creative these days is thinking through these workflows and these challenges and where the future is going. And you guys are one of the best teams in the, in the biz at taking that very creative problem solving approach to this ever growing set of media challenges. So thank you so much, mr. Gold. Thank you, mr. Gold. I might change my last name. We really do appreciate your time and yeah, just a reminder reach engine.com. Of course our listeners, if they want to learn more about levels beyond the offerings and, uh, all of that good stuff, uh, we are one of their partners and we've been working with them. We actually have a deployment here in the Baltimore metropolitan area that's unfolding right now. And it's been a wonderful process working with them. We look forward to seeing you guys at NAB, which I can't believe it's just a couple of months away now don't scare me. Let's not end on that note. Done, done next nav. So thank you so much, Danny. And thank you so much. All of our listeners and thanks for tuning into the workflow show. Have a great one, everyone. Cheers. It's been great. Thanks guys. Take care.

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