#59 Video Production and Post Production in the Cloud During Covid with Michael Kammes of Bebop Technology, Part 2

February 10, 2021 00:41:06
#59 Video Production and Post Production in the Cloud During Covid with Michael Kammes of Bebop Technology, Part 2
The Workflow Show
#59 Video Production and Post Production in the Cloud During Covid with Michael Kammes of Bebop Technology, Part 2
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On this episode of The Workflow Show we continue a great conversation with Michael Kammes of Bebop Technology. Along with discussing production and post production in the cloud and how different teams are assessing the types of workstations they can collaborate from, Ben and Jason of CHESA ask about internet bandwidth and other end-user requirements and limitations in cloud production workflows. They also discuss how changes in new technology and hardware, such as Apple’s ARM chip, could change cloud workflow.

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Speaker 0 00:00:00 Yeah. So we have talked about changes in the industry. Uh, you know, in the last year we've talked about some of the things that bebop is doing and do you have some new offerings that you'd like to let us know about or, Speaker 1 00:00:12 Yeah. And there's one other, before I jump into that, there's a couple myths I'd like to share because, uh, you know, as someone who, you know, my lifeblood is social media. I often see questions, uh, about editing in the cloud and, and you can, you can't and it's way too expensive. And one of the things that I like to look at is the booming business model that is rental, right? Because in New York and LA and other parts of the country pop up productions are renting gear, right? You're renting an avid, you're renting premiere, you're renting the storage and what's the cost of that. And, uh, we've done a lot of analysis. And obviously when you have a rental, you don't have to worry about support because if it doesn't work, they send it to the one out, or they have someone you can call. You're not liable for the gear, right? Speaker 1 00:00:57 It's someone else's responsibility. You're just paying them for that. And when we start looking at the cost of I'm going to rent a workstation and a monitor and speakers and a mixing board to desk and all that, that actually costs more than doing work in the cloud. And I think a lot of folks don't know that they think, well, it's probably cheaper on prem. The only difference really is that on-prem, you can edit for 24 hours. You can edit for one hour and you're paying the same rate. Whereas the cloud is, is a pay as you go, you know, it's, it's, it's pay based on consumption. But if we look at the average usage, the average consumption, which is usually 32 to 35 hours a week, don't tell your creatives. I told you that because they're all working 50 and 60 hours, right. But our data shows 32 to 35 hours a week. Uh, and when we take that cost and compare it to the same duration of rental, it comes out cheaper. And I think that people don't quite get that. Right. Speaker 0 00:01:51 I think it's really fantastic that you're able to gather those metrics and, and have those numbers to talk about them. That's great. Speaker 1 00:01:57 It's a fine line because people don't want folks snooping on them. Right. I don't want my post super or producer to log in and watch me edit. Or, you know, there was an article that came out this morning, I think on Microsoft, right. Microsoft had the performance analytics and there was backlash because employees thought they were being measured against some arbitrary. How many keystrokes did I have? Right. And, and I don't think that any editor wants that. I don't think any respectable management tier would want that either. And if they do want that, get out, get out now, but to get these base level metrics. So when folks come to us and say, if the cloud isn't a fixed cost, how do I budget? And then we can say, okay, here's your usual egress. Here's how many hours you're thinking of working. And, and in the cloud, the workstation is the most expensive part. It's roughly two bucks an hour. So the difference between 32 to 35 hours a week for 60 hours a week, that can really add up over the course of a Speaker 0 00:02:57 Month. Yeah. You brought up an interesting, we actually had said earlier, let's talk about collaboration a little bit. And you reminded me when you mentioned about having the producer over your shoulder, kind of a thing. And, and I mean, a lot of editors and producers are used to working that way, you know, post COVID and I post COVID world, I'm sorry. Uh, pre COVID and the before times, and the before times we had these edit sessions where, you know, you'd have your producer. If you're a production company, maybe have your client there too. Uh, maybe there's an ad agency representative there. So how's that changed? Let's talk about that a little bit. Speaker 1 00:03:29 That is an amazing segue. Thank you. Uh, and, and it's, it's probably the most nuance there have been, uh, I guess contemporaries or, or competitors to bebop and what they specialize by a large in is allowing you to easily access a workstation in the cloud, maybe tie into a render farm and then export and great, but that's opening the door, right? Collaboration is what is really going to make this sing. What's the point of paying for workstations in the cloud and storage in the cloud if you're not sharing it. And so while bebop has had access to workstations for many years now, it's been the collaboration. It's been the, here's a NAS in the sky where you're getting, you know, hundreds of megabytes, a second to each workstation here is a way to play out from your timeline directly to a web browser. So you can send that link to anyone in the world with a passcode, and they can see your timeline when you hit play. They're seeing 30 frames a second. What if a producer wants to do review and approve and what we call asynchronous review and approve Speaker 0 00:04:34 Asynchronous. Yeah. Yeah. We have talked about this on the show, but it's good. It's a good refresher, indeed Speaker 1 00:04:39 Nickel words. Right? And I hate using them, but synchronous and asynchronous, right? When someone walks into your edit Bay or an it cubicle, and you're viewing it in real time with someone that's synchronous your, seeing it and reacting to it at the same time as the creative or creatives. And you can hear the inflection in people's voices, uh, if your back of your head isn't to them, you can see their facial expressions, right. And that often speaks much more than asynchronous, which is the kind of review and approve, right? Like when you push something to YouTube and then someone watches, it makes comments, that's asynchronous. And depending on, uh, what time zones, right? Depending on the agreement, you have worked out with your production company, you can use one, you can use the other, or you can use both, but we find without a shadow of a doubt, a synchronous is the best way, because then you're getting back and forth. Speaker 1 00:05:29 It's not like sending texts back and forth. You can annotate, you can do little things you can pick up on. Well, he smiled better on this tape than the last one. Okay. Let's use that one. And so what bebop has done, uh, as I think a lot of other companies have tried is we're going to do both right frame IO has done a fantastic job of asynchronous, right. But synchronous, it's wanting a little bit. So we've decided to say different folks, different strokes for different folks. We going to make one that is asynchronous. One that is synchronous. And then depending on your team and workflow, you can use both or one or the other. And that's one of the features that we released just last month. Speaker 0 00:06:08 And so you were talking a little bit about being able to stream something everywhere in the world. Is that using NDI? Speaker 1 00:06:14 So that's a good question. NDI is, is unquestionably the leader right now in video, over IP, right? Because broadcast adopts it. You don't need to rent a satellite truck. You don't have to depend on cellular. Uh, so NDI is definitely part of our plumbing. We work very closely with. <inaudible> great, great folks. And including Dr. Andrew Cross, if you know, Dr. Andrew Cross, do you know what a, what a visionary and brilliant person he is? So NDI is part of what bebop offers that allows us to route video. Uh, I know people on the podcast can't see it, but allows us to use devices like these right new tech spark, which will take, you know, your NDI signal in, and then I'll put HD SDI or HTMI, but that's not the end all be all because NDI does take up a good chunk of bandwidth. And a lot of times, unless you're broadcast, you may not need that. Speaker 1 00:07:01 So then we look at, you know, web streaming protocols and, uh, those often work great. The fact that we can play out and show either your entire computer gooey, or just your playout monitor and route that to a webpage, it's a complete game changer. I hate, I hate to use that, you know, often used term, but just think about that from your timeline, you can hit play. And every pixel, all the audio is a hundred percent in sync and you're watching it in a web browser, which means you can watch it anywhere, even on your phone. And that is just an amazing thing. And it's probably one of my favorite features that bebop, uh, has come out with in my time here. Speaker 0 00:07:40 Yep. Awesome. NDI is network device interface, right? Correct. Terms of Speaker 1 00:07:44 It's, uh, taking out your SDI cable and using ethernet cable and then routing it around the world. And it's Mo it's best served on a land because of the, you know, the high quality stream right now is a hundred megabits, which is DVC pro HD for all you other old folks on the line, which is a pretty hefty codec on your public internet. Right. Plus latency and all that. So it's best on a land, but when you're in the cloud, you have that bandwidth of the data center. So routing NDI around is not okay. Speaker 0 00:08:16 Right, right, right. Sure. It's really a matter of, of, of routing it over the internet. That is, you know, that's the challenge. Why don't we get into, uh, how some of these NLE doll color systems work a little bit differently with the cloud? I don't want to spend too much time on this because I don't remember. I want to really go down the path of, well, this platform, that platform, but it is worth kind of mentioning because people do have these questions, you know, they're using these platforms, it's probably worth just kind of, we talked about pro tools a little bit in our, in our prep, like how is pro tools working with the cloud? How is media composer working with the cloud? Like for your audition? You know, I used to have a joke about which was a, we Speaker 1 00:08:56 Have Adobe anywhere, avid everywhere and Apple, nowhere. Now, now the joke is kind of dated because there'll be anywhere as a dead product. It was killed a couple of years ago, uh, avid everywhere. I think when there was a leadership change, that phrase kind of went away and Apple, you know, unless you go back to final cut, uh, server, right there really hasn't been a cloud component. Maybe we'll discuss this later with the back mini announcement by AWS and making Macanese available in the cloud that may change. But there's a lot of caveats there. Uh, avid has had a product called avid edit on demand, which is essentially they've partnered with Microsoft several years ago. They've developed a way to run media composer in the cloud, uh, utilizing the Azure stack, which gives you unity nexus ISIS type bin locking. So you can edit via a cloud machine just as you would back in the facility. Speaker 1 00:09:48 The problem is, is that it was in early access beta when the, when the pandemic hit. And, you know, I don't want to rattle off their price sheet, but it was rather cost prohibitive on a per user basis. And when you start working with larger enterprise companies, they've already made strategic financial partnerships with Google and, uh, Microsoft and, and Amazon avid doesn't allow that avid says you have to pay our price and you have to use Azure period. And it'll only run in certain data centers around the world. So for a very small sliver of the population of the post population, okay, it's doable. And when you deal with TV shows that are already in the middle of a season, telling them to go switch to another editorial platform, isn't going to fly, right. When you start getting to Adobe, Adobe has been working towards the cloud for quite a while. Speaker 1 00:10:35 And obviously a lot of their apps now are relying on sensei, which is, you know, machine learning. They've had teams, they've had, they released a couple of months ago. A, I don't know if you've seen, I don't know if you've seen this, uh, PDFs on how to virtualize Adobe apps. They actually released no, I saw the eyebrow raiser. Yes. They released documents on how to virtualize in most clouds because they obviously Adobe has a ton of enterprise clients that say, look, we want to virtualize, tell us how to do it as much as we can. Exactly. Exactly. And we can, Speaker 2 00:11:04 And it's a novel. The PDFs are a novel it'll help you. Speaker 1 00:11:07 But that combined with the things that bebop has been doing strategically with Adobe, they're really making a big push to allow that when we then look at things like final cut, you still need an Apple system. Uh, and you can certainly go to MacStadium or, uh, or now AWS, but there's no acceleration. Uh, if you're dealing with MacStadium, usually it's a Q nap or Synology, there's no screen-sharing protocol that will give you the frame rate and sync AB that you need. So while there's the rough idea that you can do final cut in the cloud, it's not, it's not being done. And if it is it's, it's, the quality is not good. The, the, the real big change we've seen is that, uh, is black magic. And obviously resolve over the past six or seven has, has garnered a lot of market share, especially in finishing color. Speaker 1 00:11:57 And to some extent, DIT usage the professional. And I use that term lightly. So don't send me any hate mail, the television and film ecosystem largely by and large has not moved to resolve for editorial, just because, you know, people have make their money on how well they know the apps and, uh, they don't want to move. But what we've seen is, is black magic. Historically doesn't make money on software, right? Resolve, you know, w uh, $300, I think for studio. And then they have the free version. They obviously would love for you to buy their thousand dollar keyboard or a black magic card. And when you're in the cloud, you're not buying hardware, right? So there was, I don't want to say an aversion, but, uh, grant to his credit has said, you know, he's not a huge fan of people paying every month for software, right? Speaker 1 00:12:44 A lot of the Annelies Lear paying a monthly, a monthly or yearly fee, and grant has said, no, I don't like that. And that is completely opposite of what the cloud is, which is, you know, you pay as you go. But we have seen that there's been a greater level of acceptance that this is coming, whether you like it or not. And there should at least be a way to run, resolve in the cloud or in a virtualized environment, even if it's on prem and still have it function, like you'd expect it to the only other last software. Uh, cause I know you didn't wanna spend a lot of time and this is pro tools and pro tools. Avid has the keys to that. Avid does not allow pro tools to be virtualized if you get it running. Wow. Okay, good for you. But you're going to hit latency. That is going to be murder. Uh, if you look at frames per second, right, 24, 30, 60, 90, whatever. But when you're dealing with audio it's samples, right, 48,000 samples or 192,000 samples a second. And that latency, when you start trying to get into the sample level to start doing edits becomes really difficult. So I don't think we're quite there yet. Speaker 0 00:13:48 So, you know, we we've talked about this before, too. Just the difference in the way an application like premiere versus an application like pro tools works with rendering premiere renders a lot, you're rendering down to like what you're watching and pro tools doesn't really do that. So you're kind of keeping all those files open as you're playing your timeline. And that's a change in itself to just how the application works and how it touches the, Speaker 1 00:14:10 You bring up a really good point. One of the features that ProTools introduced hell a decade ago, I think maybe more was the ability to cash, right? It will go out and read the audio files and cash them locally. Uh, and because they're audio files, they don't take up a lot of space with our insane amount of Ram we can have nowadays that becomes a possible Avenue, right? It's in the cloud, Cassius locally, but another technology that does something very similar that is by far, one of the best softwares I've come across in the past decade is something called lucid link. Uh, and lucid link allows you to Mount cloud storage, less expensive storage and edit from there because what lucid link is doing is only requesting the bits and bytes for that frame. It is then cashing that on your system. And when you hit play it's prefetching and putting that on your timeline, when you hit stop, it stops prefetching. Speaker 1 00:15:07 So your aunt's here. So if you're trying to play a pro Rez file, you're not downloading that entire 20 megabytes a second. You're downloading just the bits and bytes you need. And it fools the OLS into thinking the entire file is right. So bebop came across this technology and we thought, you know what, right now bebop is using cloud storage, cloud workstations. And we're using really expensive block storage, right? Which is a, you know, 125 to 250 bucks a terabyte. What if we integrated lucid link with bebop? So you can edit off less expensive storage in the cloud and have that cash on your cloud machine. And because it's all in the cloud, you're getting hundreds of megabytes a second. So we spent a long time working with lucid link, getting this integrated. So it appears as normal storage to be Bob. And it's now given us a way to come back and say, okay, bebop may be a little expensive with that expensive storage, but here's an option for less expensive storage and what this will most likely allow in the future. Speaker 1 00:16:09 I can't give timeframes or anything, but what is that lucid blank. If you load it on your home machine, you can access content in the cloud, right? That's what it's supposed to do. But what if the same content you're at home user is accessing via the via their local machine into the cloud is the same storage that your bebop workstation is using. You now have a complete hybrid of cloud editing and on-prem editing. You can the same pool of storage. So, um, that's something down the road that we're looking into, but it further reduces the cost of entry to get working, uh, with cloud content. Yeah. Speaker 3 00:16:44 Yeah. That's fantastic. That's a huge boon do too, as well for organizations that have large data sets, right? Where maybe you want to have multiple hundreds of terabytes worth of footage available, available to you in your desktop. Like you used to have in the office, but at home you can't write well. That's where something like lucid link can come in and be really useful because it pretends that you have hundreds of terabytes on your desktop, but it only streams the bits and bytes you need. Speaker 1 00:17:12 And there's another great component to that. At least when you use block storage in the cloud, the fast storage it's pre it's pre-provisioned. So I'd say, Ben, how much storage do you think you'll use this month? And you'll say, well, five. So why don't you give us six just to be on the safe side. So you're paying for six, whether you use six or not, when you, when we integrate lucid link with bebop in, into what we call a flex storage it's consumption-based. So if you use five terabytes, you pay for five terabytes of use five terabytes of 5.1 terabytes, you pay for 5.1 terabytes. So it comes in an even a lower price point because there isn't that pre estimate. Yeah. And Speaker 0 00:17:50 What, what happens if you run out of room in your block storage with what you've free allocated or you're just done, right? Yeah. Speaker 1 00:17:56 We have our plumbing as we call it, uh, notifies us at 85, 90, 95, then 95. So, uh, when we get those notifications, we notify the, what we call organization, admin, Oregon bin, and let them know, Hey, best practices to keep this, you know, not as full as you have it right now. And then we start working with them on tiered storage in the cloud, right. Block storage would be your sand, your tier two, your object storage would be your NAS. And we try to kind of orchestrate storage methodologies. But as we talked about at the beginning, that a lot of times makes heads peep people's heads explode because now you're discussing cloud storage methodology when they've don't use the cloud. Right. Speaker 0 00:18:35 Do you think that, I dunno, I just kind of feel like that's going to change eventually and people will start thinking of the cloud more. I think, I think we're still, even though all of this cloud technology and terminology feels new to a lot of, a lot of folks, I kind of feel like it's going to get more part of our lingo, just like San versus NAS is right now because of this fantastic, you know, because of the fact that we had to get sort of thrust into it so quickly and so completely, I don't know. It seems like we will get to a point maybe even in the near future where a lot of this will will become just a lot more everyday lingo for, for folks. Speaker 1 00:19:15 I was watching back to the future of the other day and, uh, you know, the scene where Marty's on stage and he does a Johnny B Goode and it starts out real well. And then people just stare at him and he gets up to the mic and he says, I guess you folks aren't ready for that yet, but your kids are going to love it. And that, to me, that was the cloud. Yeah. Right. Speaker 0 00:19:35 That is a fantastic analogy. Speaker 1 00:19:37 And I, it's not going to be 30 years, right. Because 1955, 1985, 30 years. Uh, so it's, it's definitely not going to be 30 years, but if you think about that at the beginning, when he was playing, people were into it, right. So there is going to be, and I don't want to say people are old and they're stuck in their ways, but there are some folks who are, I'm happy in my station, in life. I'm happy with how tech is now. I'm maybe on the second half of my professional career, I'm going to ride this out. And there were plenty of film editors who did the same thing, right? When avid came out in the nineties, you know what, I'm in my late forties, I'm in my fifties, I'm just going to ride this out because you can't teach an old dog new tricks. And there's going to be some people who are going to be like that. Right. But I think there's a massive new influx of creatives who have, uh, who want to be influencers and who have YouTube channels and whatnot who are open to these workflows that fall outside the traditional post-production paradigm. And I think those are the folks who are dancing at the beginning of that scene and those who are the folks who are going to adopt it. And then when the new crop of creatives come up, it's just going to be second nature. Right. Speaker 0 00:20:40 So let's talk about big Sur because I mean, I think that's a little bit where our walled, a beloved Speaker 3 00:20:48 Overlords in Cupertino are kind of pushing some of this technology. I mean, clearly they've got a hardware model and they're not necessarily adapting to the cloud in some ways, but let's take a second to dream about some of the possibilities that kind of a unified platform might be able to bring us between mobile and desktop and cloud and on premises, because I think that's where we're going. Right. Eventually, you know, I'm going to be able to pull up my pocket device probably in the next couple of years and edit in the same way that I would on another device in maybe it is just streaming to what might be running in the cloud or to another machine somewhere else. And maybe it's, you know, via not virtual, but, uh, augmented. Right. Maybe we've got a pair of glasses and it's throwing things up in via augmented reality. And that were augmented reality. AR the display in front of us is projecting on our wall or, um, whatever it is, you know? So there's, I think there's tremendous amount of possibility here that you're right. It's painful for us as technologists to adapt to every year, especially when it's like, I finally felt competent in how we're doing it this year. And then, Oh, I've got to learn everything new again next year. And then there's a whole new rash of feeling bad Speaker 1 00:22:11 Magic has a new color science gen, uh, you know, yeah. Oh, ACEs has a new release. Uh, Speaker 3 00:22:20 Yeah. And then it's imposter syndrome all over again. Right. Speaker 1 00:22:24 I am not completely sure that Apple is all in the cloud. And let me be very specific about this because obviously they do a lot of stuff in the cloud. Right. But what they've done with AWS, AWS, uh, announced is that you now have Mac mini instances, uh, in AWS and <inaudible> instance, which means it can connect to storage and, and whatnot, but it's bare metal, right? There's no virtualization. It's just the OS. But what is interesting is to me, this feels like a joint dip, our toe in the water, right? AWS already knows people will use the cloud. They're making money hand over fist, just look at Jeff Bezos, net worth, right? They're making money, hand over fist. But Apple aside from third-party data centers, doesn't have a data center where you can say, look, I want to use 10 machines. So this feels a lot like both of them dipping their toe in the water and seeing who is going to use this. Speaker 1 00:23:17 Now, I think they've already put some artificial barriers up because there's no great screen-sharing protocol, right? The Mac mini it's the Intel one. So while it has some horsepower, you're not going to get a 16 gig GPU. So for M and a for creatives, it's a, it's a non-starter that's, that's not going to fly, but for devs, it's great. But if you unpack the pricing, it's very cost prohibitive. So we're talking hundreds of dollars a month. You could buy a new Mac mini almost every month for what you're paying. So, uh, I think it's a, a concerted effort, uh, to see we call it the spaghetti factor. Right? You throw it against the wall and see what sticks. Right. And I think this is a lot of what that is. It's a measured experiment to see what the public, uh, what the consumers are interested in. Speaker 3 00:24:01 It's almost, as if someone said, Hey, we have a huge hardware refresh and we've got all of these entitlement, many sitting around, what could we do? I can't imagine Speaker 1 00:24:12 That they, they would do something, but no, you're right. The first thing when I saw that was that's an old gen, why would you, the chip sets changed right. Much from Intel to arm. So yeah, but again, corporations are, are slow glaciers, no pun intended AWS glacier. So it obviously took months to get the gear, configure it, where they can get analytics and deploy it. And all the integrations, I would think Apple would have shared the fact that arms were coming. I mean, all of us saw that arms were coming, but perhaps it was a measured financial experiment. So to speak, to see if it still sparked interest Speaker 3 00:24:49 For me, the thinking about the arm technology and system on it, in what they're doing with this system on a chip, right. I think what that's going to lead to is very much like we experienced with our phones in a day-to-day basis. Our phones are wickedly fast, but most of the software it's interacting with other arm processors in a data center in the cloud. Right. And so now that Apple is kind of moving everything in that direction. It really sets a new paradigm for being able to go back and forth, I think in a different way. And I'm kind of excited to see where that might go in the, Speaker 1 00:25:25 The future. Um, I'm completely with you, uh, I'm in complete agreement on that. Uh, but I also have to separate the general consumer at large, and then the microcosm of a microcosm that is professional M and a right. Media entertainment. So they, they kind of diverge and I have to be able to realize, all right, that's for everyone else. And this is for our small subset. Speaker 3 00:25:46 I'll give it to them though. They've kept up with, they didn't kill final cut. Logic is still rocking like nobody's business. And so they've kind of at least stuck to their guns there and then kept their high priests happy in some way, shape or form Speaker 1 00:26:01 Someone pointed out something very interesting the other day, which I thought was funny. Lucas, Wilson. I don't know if you don't look as Wilson. He a super sphere and, and did stuff with Cameron pace. He had a great comment. He said, Microsoft has embraced its nerdiness. If you go to their website, you can buy an ugly Ms. Paint sweater. And, and what that kind of conveys is that Microsoft has realized we don't have to be the cool people. We just have to be people who get it done. And if you want to be cool, go be an Apple fan. Boy, that's fine because anything they do and you're going to love, but Microsoft has finally said, you know what? We don't need to be that. Right. And I just, I just get a complete kick out of that kind of accepting their place and then kind of bulldozing full ahead on that. Indeed. Speaker 0 00:26:44 It's interesting. We, we do certainly have, it's just something I'm observing a lot lately is that we do sort of have this spectrum of, of thought about how we get our work done as it's, it's like the sort of perfectionism mentality, which I kind of have a lot of, which is like, Oh, if we just had all of this stuff, we could do some really cool stuff. And then there's the other side of it, which is we don't ever say we can't do this because of, we just do it. Like you just do whatever it takes to get it done, you know? And there's all kinds of like gradients within those, those two schools of thought, uh, about how we get our stuff done, which I think is just fascinating. I think that we get that both sides of the spectrum have a lot to learn from each other, which is for sure. Speaker 0 00:27:24 Great. Why don't we talk a little bit about let's let's wind down here and let's, let's talk about Lake for the folks who are working from home. Maybe they've been working from home for months and it was just like frustrated because we're just, you know, bandwidth is just, it's not that great. And I mean, I, I, again, cellular internet, um, I live in the middle of nowhere, so that's the only option for me for broadband. And, uh, it works. It works for me. I've, you know, I've been working from home for months. It works fine. I'm doing this video call right now. We are all, all of us on video. And, um, you know, it's, it's working fine, but there are times when it's not working that great. So what are some things that people like me can do common everyday, things that I think we take for granted when we're plugged into our machines and our office, let's just talk about some things we can do to just keep bandwidth top of mind, bandwidth out from our house to internet. Speaker 1 00:28:19 Well, the first one is don't be wireless. Wireless is great for a Pandora or Spotify. Uh, it may be great for web surfing, but don't use wireless. If you're trying to access media, shared desktops, et cetera, because those types of use cases require a sustained throughput, a constant, reliable stream of data. And when you go wireless, you're already killing your effective throughput. You're now introducing when you introduce distance between your machine and where the wireless modem or router is, uh, you're now introducing physical, uh impedances right. You're now have walls and mill. And then all of you who have roommates or partners or children, right. They're doing distance learning. Well as well. So what's hysterical is I shouldn't say a circle, but I'll be on a meeting with someone. And then at around the top of the hour or bottom of the hour, they start to drop out and someone invariably says, Hey, Jill, you're sick. Speaker 1 00:29:16 You know, we can't hear you. Oh, my husband's just jumped on a call or my daughter has school. So going wirelessly is not going to help things at all. So you want to be wired, luckily, a switch or a router that also has switching capability. Uh, you can get basic ones from your cable company. If you have broadband the other day, I went because I needed a new modem. And normally you have to pay for that. Right? You rent it from them every month. They said, Oh, here's okay, great. So maybe go to your cable provider and say, look, I, things have changed little. Yeah. Give me one that has a couple of ethernet jacks, uh, ethernet cable, dead cheap, dead cheap. You don't have to get the gold-plated stuff. Right? You don't have to go with monster cables. You can get a cheap cat, five cat six, and you'll be fine. Right. Also, you mentioned something earlier about a TCP IP and chatter, right? Most editors because they have bandwidth, right? They're sinking Dropbox, they're streaming Spotify. They got 80 tabs open in Chrome and they're doing it as fair. Speaker 0 00:30:13 And so is everybody else in the house, right. You know? Right. So you have all that internal communication going on on your internal home network. Plus, you know, if you're doing anything that's communicating with the internet, it's, you know, that's the other thing. I mean, I have this conversation with my partner all the time. What are some things that it impact the bandwidth for the house? And that might impact my work. Things like listening to music, probably not let you listen to music on a Bluetooth speaker in the house. That's going to take up some internal bandwidth. But again, my bottleneck is, is my connection to the outside world. So that's not going to be really much of an impact if you've got a few children though in the house, and they're all doing that, that's going to affect your internal bandwidth. If, if everybody's watching YouTube videos, which is the case, a lot of the case today, we have YouTube, we've got Amazon prime and Netflix and Hulu and all that. That's all going to the internet. It's all affecting your pipe. I mean, my solution is, Hey, um, can you turn off wifi for an hour, right? Speaker 1 00:31:09 Yeah. You you're completely. Right. And I think there's a lot of apps that are phoning home that you may not know about. Right. Uh, if you're running Adobe, right. Creative cloud is constantly trying to sync. Avid link is constantly trying to sync. Dropbox is always trying to sync. And you know, if you're like me and you have five browser windows on Chrome, each of them have 30 tabs, you know, look at a plugin like the great suspender, right. Which will hibernate that tab until you click on it to activate it. And then that stops the constant polling up to the cloud. And also, you know, the browsers, your memory sucks. So close down your browsers if not being used. So those are some things that you can do to kind of mitigate some of those, but something that's more advanced and most people won't do this, but you know, if you're into zeros and ones, like I am, there's something called QoS or quality of service, more prosumer and professional routers or integrated routers and switches. Speaker 1 00:32:06 We'll have a webpage. You can go to, to configure it. And that's where you give priority to certain machines on your network or even priority to protocols. So if you're using, you know, bebop, which is PC over IP, uh, give priority PC over IP. If I know my static IP or my Mac address for my machine on the network, give that priority. Or if you're doing something larger, treat your remote editing network, like you would a, a VoIP system for voiceover IP. So your IP based phones build it like that because network is completely separate and only for this, this high quality trafficker. Speaker 0 00:32:44 See, what else do we want to talk about? Anything else? Oh, five things. Yeah. Michael's astonishing Twitter games. Speaker 1 00:32:53 Well, you know, when you're, when you're stuck at home, so I've, I've been, uh, with my partner, we've been in this under thousands foot square house for seven years saving money for the house. So I know all too well about, you know, being in an enclosed space and we're both working from home. So, uh, five things, uh, you've probably noticed I haven't released a lot in the past, uh, several months, uh, mainly because I can't recall a time in my life when I've had to work harder. Yeah, yeah. Amen to that. Bebop is just, you know, as I, as I say, often, we weren't built for the pandemic, but we certainly fit the bill and the amount of demos and discussions and, and education, which I love has been taken up my time. And at the end of the day, I am sometimes almost hoarse. Speaker 1 00:33:36 I'm just exhausted. And, uh, also, you know, I'm not sure where the series is going to go. Now that I'm working in kind of the bebop rental, as opposed to the previous 10 years at keycode, you know, gave me access to a lot more tech. Although I will have a new website launching by the end of the year. In fact, it's, it's finished in production right now. We just have to move or almost completed in staging, just has to be move to production. And I will have some episodes coming out. So I'll give you a quick teaser, uh, where the episodes I'm working on now is something that movie labs put out a year ago before the pandemic. And it was called filmmaking in 2030. Now, if you're not familiar with movie labs, it's a nonprofit, but it's filled with the heads of technology from all the Hollywood studios. Speaker 1 00:34:18 So this isn't just some, you know, a technology evangelist like myself saying this is going to be the future. It's the heads of tech of studios saying, this is where we're collectively, all of us are working towards, this is kind of the end goal we're looking at. And we're already taking strides there. So as an informed consumer and creative, here's what you need to know. Here's how we're working. And that document was released last year. But a lot of people didn't see it because it's, it's really kind of meant for a certain subset of the industry. But what's scary is when you go through it, now that we're in the pandemic, you go through and you're like, yeah, makes sense. Yeah. It makes sense. Well, that makes perfect sense. But a year ago this was like, yeah, that's pretty lofty. I don't think that's going to happen. Speaker 0 00:35:03 So that's what we're here to talk about, Michael. I mean, we're here to talk about what's changed in the last year and you're right, right there. You're, you're hitting the nail on the head. Speaker 1 00:35:11 I think either had a webinar or a seminar or released an addendum to this saying, Hey, things have changed in the past year. Here are some updated input on that, but this document, I think it wasn't broadcast. It wasn't part of our conversation. It wasn't part of the creative conversation. It was great. It was great for CTOs and vendors that work with Hollywood studios, but it wasn't part of the creative conversation. And I want to change that. So it's taking that, making it digestible, like I do with five things. Uh, and so that's most likely the next episode. Speaker 0 00:35:44 That's fantastic. Michael, that sounds awesome. Looking forward to it. I can't wait for that to come out. Yeah. Well, great. Well, let's, let's talk some fun questions. Oh yeah, yeah, absolutely. But when, one of the things we've been doing, uh, at the kind of the end of the show, we've been asking people a couple of random fun things. Like what are the fun shows you've been watching? What's some great new music you were listening to. And most importantly, what, what are some of the great workflows that you've seen making people's lives Speaker 1 00:36:13 Easier? I've been, we've been following a lot of the, uh, you know, the Queen's gambit and, uh, you know, some of the more heavily popularized shows in terms of, uh, individual ones like, like ones that are like, kind of, I don't wanna say off the grid, but ones that are off the beaten path. Um, growing up, I had my parents owned a house, but there was never any repair work done by them. I knew nothing. I never was taught to use a drill. I didn't learn to use a DeWalt until I was 20. Right. I used to be called the tech with no tools. Uh, so I have absolutely zero inclination for home improvement. And now that we're buying a house, it's time for me to learn up. So I've been like searching for shows. And this just goes to what my attention span is. I don't care about the reality shows. I don't care about what, how should I buy no, don't bore us get to the courts. How are you replacing that two by four, right? How are you putting in that window frame? Uh, and, and it's just, it's it's mind numbing. And it kills me because I don't want to hear the cymbal rolls right. To, to try and build up that drama. I just show me how you do it. Speaker 0 00:37:20 Thank you so much, Michael. This is, you're speaking my language here. Cause this is I I'm. This is me. I'm very much like, I want to know how to do the thing. I don't care about the drama, like get the drama out of there. So, you know, for me, I apologize to all of our, uh, our friends and clients who, you know, produce some of these jobs is the drama that's I get it. That's, that's what we're going for. But you know, me, I just want to know how to do the thing, Speaker 1 00:37:46 Edit data fails us. Right. If I go to phylo, which I never would have gotten phylo if they didn't carry, you know, virtually everything HGTV has, but what if I want to learn how to fix my fireplace? Right. I can't type in fireplace and get a hundred episodes. I only get fireplace if it's in the title. So I've been searching for how to do X, Y, and Z. And I can't because that metadata isn't present in the search function and Oh, sure. I can go to YouTube, but we all know YouTube can be a mixed bag. Right. You've seen those videos of kids who, uh, were told they could drill a hole in their iPhone because it would give them, uh, a headphone Jack. Right. So I don't want to, because I know nothing about home improvement to say, Oh, Oh, I can just take a sledgehammer to that. And then, you know, do this and find out I've totally been punked. So it's been difficult to find the kind of things I want. And I guess I'm used to five things, which is, you know, uh, here's the info, no filler. Speaker 0 00:38:42 Yep. And here's what you really want. Yeah. Speaker 1 00:38:45 I can get, so I just have to consider myself an you and I have to be outliers. Okay. Speaker 0 00:38:51 Yeah. I mean, I, you know, on the, on the, on the other side of that, I also do like stories because stories are really what connects us to, to, you know, the applications of what we're doing. It's, you know, you, you've got to have a reason to believe so, you know, the stories are good. I it's finding that balance between the drama and the, you know, what's the meat and potatoes of this. Like how do I do the thing exactly.

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